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Thread: bluetooth

  1. #1
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    bluetooth

    just got a bluetooth phone and was wondering if some 1 could give me some pointers as far as accessories.

    does price range affect clearness, or does all bluetooth sound good through an ear piece?

    blue tooth for usb port? and etc.

    also any good places for purchase , possible web sites?

    thank you for the help!!

    http://justlube.net/?page_id=44

  2. #2
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    Re: bluetooth

    bump!!!!!

    any help????? :boohoo:

    http://justlube.net/?page_id=44

  3. #3
    cc21 is offline Ring of Fame
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    Re: bluetooth

    No idea what a bluetooth phone is. Sorry...

  4. #4
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    Re: bluetooth

    "coreychavous21" wrote:
    No idea what a bluetooth phone is. Sorry...
    since we are on this subject, could someone explain bluetooth first?

  5. #5
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    Re: bluetooth

    ok , bluetooth is a phone that can wirelessly transmit a signal to any other bluetooth device, ( headset , other bluetooth cell phones , etc.) . like video music and pictures, totally eliminating pay per download. so any music you have on your computer (with the right adapter) you can put on your phone as ring tones , and same with pictures.

    http://justlube.net/?page_id=44

  6. #6
    purplepride818 is offline Starter
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    Re: bluetooth

    maybe this will help.


    There are lots of different ways that electronic devices can connect to one another. For example:
    Component cables
    Electrical wires
    Ethernet cables
    WiFi
    Infrared signals
    When you use computers, entertainment systems or telephones, the various pieces and parts of the systems make up a community of electronic devices. These devices communicate with each other using a variety of wires, cables, radio signals and infrared light beams, and an even greater variety of connectors, plugs and protocols.

    The art of connecting things is becoming more and more complex every day. In this article, we will look at a method of connecting devices, called Bluetooth, that can streamline the process. A Bluetooth connection is wireless and automatic, and it has a number of interesting features that can simplify our daily lives.

    The Problem
    When any two devices need to talk to each other, they have to agree on a number of points before the conversation can begin. The first point of agreement is physical: Will they talk over wires, or through some form of wireless signals? If they use wires, how many are required -- one, two, eight, 25? Once the physical attributes are decided, several more questions arise:

    How much data will be sent at a time? For instance, serial ports send data 1 bit at a time, while parallel ports send several bits at once.

    How will they speak to each other? All of the parties in an electronic discussion need to know what the bits mean and whether the message they receive is the same message that was sent. This means developing a set of commands and responses known as a protocol.
    The Bluetooth Solution
    Bluetooth takes small-area networking to the next level by removing the need for user intervention and keeping transmission power extremely low to save battery power. Picture this: You're on your Bluetooth-enabled cell phone, standing outside the door to your house. You tell the person on the other end of the line to call you back in five minutes so you can get in the house and put your stuff away. As soon as you walk in the house, the map you received on your cell phone from your car's Bluetooth-enabled GPS system is automatically sent to your Bluetooth-enabled computer, because your cell phone picked up a Bluetooth signal from your PC and automatically sent the data you designated for transfer. Five minutes later, when your friend calls you back, your Bluetooth-enabled home phone rings instead of your cell phone. The person called the same number, but your home phone picked up the Bluetooth signal from your cell phone and automatically re-routed the call because it realized you were home. And each transmission signal to and from your cell phone consumes just 1 milliwatt of power, so your cell phone charge is virtually unaffected by all of this activity.

    Bluetooth is essentially a networking standard that works at two levels:

    It provides agreement at the physical level -- Bluetooth is a radio-frequency standard.

    It provides agreement at the protocol level, where products have to agree on when bits are sent, how many will be sent at a time, and how the parties in a conversation can be sure that the message received is the same as the message sent.

    Photo courtesy Bluetooth SIG
    Bluetooth wireless PC card



    The big draws of Bluetooth are that it is wireless, inexpensive and automatic. There are other ways to get around using wires, including infrared communication. Infrared (IR) refers to light waves of a lower frequency than human eyes can receive and interpret. Infrared is used in most television remote control systems. Infrared communications are fairly reliable and don't cost very much to build into a device, but there are a couple of drawbacks. First, infrared is a "line of sight" technology. For example, you have to point the remote control at the television or DVD player to make things happen. The second drawback is that infrared is almost always a "one to one" technology. You can send data between your desktop computer and your laptop computer, but not your laptop computer and your PDA at the same time. (See How Remote Controls Works to learn more about infrared communication.)

    These two qualities of infrared are actually advantageous in some regards. Because infrared transmitters and receivers have to be lined up with each other, interference between devices is uncommon. The one-to-one nature of infrared communications is useful in that you can make sure a message goes only to the intended recipient, even in a room full of infrared receivers.

    Bluetooth is intended to get around the problems that come with infrared systems. The older Bluetooth 1.0 standard has a maximum transfer speed of 1 megabit per second (Mbps), while Bluetooth 2.0 can manage up to 3 Mbps. Bluetooth 2.0 is backward compatible with 1.0 devices.

    Let's find out how Bluetooth networking works

    http://www.howstuffworks.com/bluetooth.htm

  7. #7
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    Re: bluetooth

    thank you, now i feel a little bit smarter.

  8. #8
    purplepride818 is offline Starter
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    Re: bluetooth

    Why is it called Bluetooth?
    Harald Bluetooth was king of Denmark in the late 900s. He managed to unite Denmark and part of Norway into a single kingdom then introduced Christianity into Denmark. He left a large monument, the Jelling rune stone, in memory of his parents. He was killed in 986 during a battle with his son, Svend Forkbeard. Choosing this name for the standard indicates how important companies from the Nordic region (nations including Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland) are to the communications industry, even if it says little about the way the technology works.

  9. #9
    Vikes's Avatar
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    Re: bluetooth

    I have the Motorola HS850. Works really well.

    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=6534609&type=product&productCate goryId=cat08286&id=1077629705624
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    The rigors of Spartan life. Leonidas is cast out into the wild, and survives the harsh winter to return to his home, when he is crowned King ....a Viking!

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  10. #10
    Benet's Avatar
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    Re: bluetooth

    Bluetooth is a brilliantly-convenient device.. I use it all the time. The phone companies actually managed to make something cross-compatible that is really cool to use.

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