Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    shockzilla's Avatar
    shockzilla is offline PPO Ambassador
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States
    Posts
    6,204
    Blog Entries
    29

    Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    OK, here's another one to pass the time...

    What U.S. state was originally known as "Franklin" before it got its current name?
    PPO Ambassador, Defender of the Purple Faith and Guardian of the Gates of Valhalla

  2. #2
    tjg07's Avatar
    tjg07 is offline Training Camp
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    25

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    Tennesee

  3. #3
    cc21 is offline Ring of Fame
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    3,599

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    north dakota :lol:

  4. #4
    ryanmurphy is offline Pro-Bowler
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    391

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    "shockzilla" wrote:
    OK, here's another one to pass the time...

    What U.S. state was originally known as "Franklin" before it got its current name?
    As far as I know, Franklin never really changed its name. It was originally a part of North Carolina that split off to form a new state, then 4 years later, merged with Tennesee, which was also a new State.

  5. #5
    cajunvike's Avatar
    cajunvike is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    32,063

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    Good catch, tjg! Actually, it only covered the area which is now Upper East Tennessee, only lasted from 1786 to 1788 and was absorbed into a federal territory known as the Southwest Territory. Tennessee itself wasn't established as a state until 1796.

    So technically...

    Keep 'em coming, Shock!
    BANNED OR DEAD...I'LL TAKE EITHER ONE

  6. #6
    vikes09's Avatar
    vikes09 is offline Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,260

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    OREGON!...oh wait..

  7. #7
    tarkenton10's Avatar
    tarkenton10 is offline Star Spokesman
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    2,211

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    A territorial dispute now regarded by history as a blessing in disguise began in 1782.

    The American colonists had fought long and hard to gain their independence from Great Britain, but still had some emotional baggage left from the Revolutionary War. Americans distrusted authority and refused to take orders from fellow citizens who weren't residents of their known immediate region.

    The tension between states and their residents was thick - especially in a region of North Carolina now known as Upper East Tennessee. Settlers there hated North Carolina so much they refused to pay taxes.

    A move to separate from North Carolina gained ground in August 1784 when delegates from around the region gathered in Jonesborough. By the following December, separation was a done deal and a new state was born. Its name was Franklin - after Benjamin Franklin, one of America's founding fathers.

    How the idea came about to name the new state was unknown, but the choice was popular. The delegates penned a letter inviting Benjamin Franklin to move to the new state, and requested permission to name it after him.

    "Dr. Franklin had a greater prestige than any other American," writes author Noel B. Gerson in his book, Franklin: America's Lost State. "He was a diplomat and statesman, inventor, noted philosopher, author and publisher."

    Franklin responded that he had too many business interests in Philadelphia, and couldn't move because of his advanced age. But he was proud to give his name to the new state.

    Franklin's only governor was military hero John Sevier, who had fought 35 skirmishes against the Indians without a loss.

    "Vain, obstinate and quick-tempered, [Sevier] was also a man of great courage, foresight and ability," Gerson writes.

    Sevier immediately hit it off with settlers. He granted them a two-year grace period before paying taxes. Sevier would later become governor of another state called Tennessee.

    The year 1786 was the golden era in Franklin's brief history.

    Thousands of settlers arrived, mostly near the Tennessee, Nolichucky and Holston rivers. No one went hungry. The government was functioning and the state was at peace. Settlers were so happy they voted to remain independent of North Carolina.

    The situation with the former British colonies, however, appeared to be disintegrating. Franklin's leaders weren't interested in joining the union. They talked about becoming an independent nation and obtaining financial aid from Spain.

    But an Indian war complicated matters. By the end of March in 1788, the Cherokee, Chickamauga and Chickasaw had gone on the warpath - killing, burning, looting and scalping.

    No remote dwelling or home on the frontier was safe. Settlers were abandoning their homesteads. Taxes weren't collected.

    Franklinites set aside their differences with North Carolina and fought side by side with the state's militia. Sevier, as expected, showed no mercy to the Indians.

    The last 15 months of Franklin's history are a mystery. Only fragments of records exist. Franklin disappeared forever when it was ceded to a new federal government in the late 1780s and became known as the Southwest Territory.

    There s only two things stopping you - fear and common sense!! The Truth you CAN"T HANDLE THE TRUTH!!!!!!!!

  8. #8
    shockzilla's Avatar
    shockzilla is offline PPO Ambassador
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States
    Posts
    6,204
    Blog Entries
    29

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    "tarkenton10" wrote:
    A territorial dispute now regarded by history as a blessing in disguise began in 1782.

    The American colonists had fought long and hard to gain their independence from Great Britain, but still had some emotional baggage left from the Revolutionary War. Americans distrusted authority and refused to take orders from fellow citizens who weren't residents of their known immediate region.

    The tension between states and their residents was thick - especially in a region of North Carolina now known as Upper East Tennessee. Settlers there hated North Carolina so much they refused to pay taxes.

    A move to separate from North Carolina gained ground in August 1784 when delegates from around the region gathered in Jonesborough. By the following December, separation was a done deal and a new state was born. Its name was Franklin - after Benjamin Franklin, one of America's founding fathers.

    How the idea came about to name the new state was unknown, but the choice was popular. The delegates penned a letter inviting Benjamin Franklin to move to the new state, and requested permission to name it after him.

    "Dr. Franklin had a greater prestige than any other American," writes author Noel B. Gerson in his book, Franklin: America's Lost State. "He was a diplomat and statesman, inventor, noted philosopher, author and publisher."

    Franklin responded that he had too many business interests in Philadelphia, and couldn't move because of his advanced age. But he was proud to give his name to the new state.

    Franklin's only governor was military hero John Sevier, who had fought 35 skirmishes against the Indians without a loss.

    "Vain, obstinate and quick-tempered, [Sevier] was also a man of great courage, foresight and ability," Gerson writes.

    Sevier immediately hit it off with settlers. He granted them a two-year grace period before paying taxes. Sevier would later become governor of another state called Tennessee.

    The year 1786 was the golden era in Franklin's brief history.

    Thousands of settlers arrived, mostly near the Tennessee, Nolichucky and Holston rivers. No one went hungry. The government was functioning and the state was at peace. Settlers were so happy they voted to remain independent of North Carolina.

    The situation with the former British colonies, however, appeared to be disintegrating. Franklin's leaders weren't interested in joining the union. They talked about becoming an independent nation and obtaining financial aid from Spain.

    But an Indian war complicated matters. By the end of March in 1788, the Cherokee, Chickamauga and Chickasaw had gone on the warpath - killing, burning, looting and scalping.

    No remote dwelling or home on the frontier was safe. Settlers were abandoning their homesteads. Taxes weren't collected.

    Franklinites set aside their differences with North Carolina and fought side by side with the state's militia. Sevier, as expected, showed no mercy to the Indians.

    The last 15 months of Franklin's history are a mystery. Only fragments of records exist. Franklin disappeared forever when it was ceded to a new federal government in the late 1780s and became known as the Southwest Territory.
    Nice research - you get an "A+" for effort!!!!

    The correct answer is Tennessee.
    PPO Ambassador, Defender of the Purple Faith and Guardian of the Gates of Valhalla

  9. #9
    cajunvike's Avatar
    cajunvike is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    32,063

    Re: Another Shockzilla Trivia Question

    "tarkenton10" wrote:
    A territorial dispute now regarded by history as a blessing in disguise began in 1782.

    The American colonists had fought long and hard to gain their independence from Great Britain, but still had some emotional baggage left from the Revolutionary War. Americans distrusted authority and refused to take orders from fellow citizens who weren't residents of their known immediate region.

    The tension between states and their residents was thick - especially in a region of North Carolina now known as Upper East Tennessee. Settlers there hated North Carolina so much they refused to pay taxes.

    A move to separate from North Carolina gained ground in August 1784 when delegates from around the region gathered in Jonesborough. By the following December, separation was a done deal and a new state was born. Its name was Franklin - after Benjamin Franklin, one of America's founding fathers.

    How the idea came about to name the new state was unknown, but the choice was popular. The delegates penned a letter inviting Benjamin Franklin to move to the new state, and requested permission to name it after him.

    "Dr. Franklin had a greater prestige than any other American," writes author Noel B. Gerson in his book, Franklin: America's Lost State. "He was a diplomat and statesman, inventor, noted philosopher, author and publisher."

    Franklin responded that he had too many business interests in Philadelphia, and couldn't move because of his advanced age. But he was proud to give his name to the new state.

    Franklin's only governor was military hero John Sevier, who had fought 35 skirmishes against the Indians without a loss.

    "Vain, obstinate and quick-tempered, [Sevier] was also a man of great courage, foresight and ability," Gerson writes.

    Sevier immediately hit it off with settlers. He granted them a two-year grace period before paying taxes. Sevier would later become governor of another state called Tennessee.

    The year 1786 was the golden era in Franklin's brief history.

    Thousands of settlers arrived, mostly near the Tennessee, Nolichucky and Holston rivers. No one went hungry. The government was functioning and the state was at peace. Settlers were so happy they voted to remain independent of North Carolina.

    The situation with the former British colonies, however, appeared to be disintegrating. Franklin's leaders weren't interested in joining the union. They talked about becoming an independent nation and obtaining financial aid from Spain.

    But an Indian war complicated matters. By the end of March in 1788, the Cherokee, Chickamauga and Chickasaw had gone on the warpath - killing, burning, looting and scalping.

    No remote dwelling or home on the frontier was safe. Settlers were abandoning their homesteads. Taxes weren't collected.

    Franklinites set aside their differences with North Carolina and fought side by side with the state's militia. Sevier, as expected, showed no mercy to the Indians.

    The last 15 months of Franklin's history are a mystery. Only fragments of records exist. Franklin disappeared forever when it was ceded to a new federal government in the late 1780s and became known as the Southwest Territory.
    Google strikes again!
    BANNED OR DEAD...I'LL TAKE EITHER ONE

Similar Threads

  1. Shockzilla Trivia Question: Playoff Edition
    By shockzilla in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 01-09-2006, 05:41 AM
  2. Another Shockzilla Trivia Question
    By shockzilla in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 11-04-2005, 03:12 AM
  3. Another Shockzilla Trivia Question
    By shockzilla in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 07-05-2005, 05:43 PM
  4. Another Shockzilla Trivia Question, Part III
    By shockzilla in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 05-28-2005, 03:39 PM
  5. Another Shockzilla Trivia Question, Part II
    By shockzilla in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-28-2005, 05:32 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •