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  1. #1
    Marrdro's Avatar
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    Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    According to PFF's charting, the Vikings had 597 passing snaps in 2010. Of those 597 passing snaps, there was pressure on the quarterback on 35.01% of those snaps. . .if that sounds like an excessive number, it's not. It actually puts the Vikings as slightly better than league average.
    According to PFF, the Minnesota Vikings had a cumulative total of 2990 offensive line snaps on passing plays in 2010, and on those snaps, the offensive line was responsible for 146 pressures allowed. So, the offensive line allowed pressure on 4.88% of the snaps that they were on the field for in passing situations. Again, this is right around the league average, placing the Vikings at fifteenth overall in that category
    There were 308 snaps, according to PFF, where Vikings' backs and tight ends or receivers stayed in to block, and they were responsible for 20 pressures on the quarterback, or 6.49% of the time.
    ." To put it bluntly, these are quarterback pressures that are caused due to the quarterback holding on to the ball too long. . .or, as PFF puts it, "the quarterback holding on to the ball too long and inviting pressure upon himself." The Vikings. . .well, the Vikings didn't fare so well in this category. And by "didn't fare so well," what I mean is "finished dead last in the NFL." So, between Brett Favre, Tarvaris Jackson, and Joe Webb, at least some of the pressure that the Vikings' offense allowed was due to quarterbacks holding on to the football too long.
    Vikings' Offensive Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressure

    Hmmmmmmmmmmm, hasn't some yutz been on here chanting something about charting games and how the OL is at or above average all the while some on here have been saying they suck.

    I think, however, that that same yutz was suprised at how well the backs and TE's graded out. He had them alot worse than these cats did.
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  2. #2
    2beersTommy's Avatar
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    Then there's the third category. . .a category called "Quarterback-Invited Pressures."

    really? QB invited pressure? that sounds a little similar to a "self inflicted orgasm"

  3. #3
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    is there a stat for number of times a runningback was hit behind the line of scrimmage?

  4. #4
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    You missed this little nugget:
    So there you have our breakdown of who’s allowing the pressure. You’ll realize there’s a large percentage of pressure unaccounted for, and those are due to unblocked players that come free against roll outs or on overload blitzes, etc. Our goal here, though, is to show where the responsibility lies for all plays that can be attributed.
    Hopefully you understand how that omission skews the ratio.


    Also, the QB induced pressures were not broken down but I will say that I would believe they would be high for Brett since he was hobbled by injury from the beginning of the year and also hampered by not being in sync due to him not being in camp with the team.

    I would be willing to wager that TJ and Webb certainly bumped up that ratio though and made it higher than it was with Brett on the field even in his hobbled condition.


    In the end though, posting an article that states our OL is nothing better than average is no vindication for their play. It just reinforces what we have been saying in that the OL is a liability and needs to be upgraded to be considered elite and capable of being a consistent title contender.

  5. #5
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    Quote Originally Posted by "Purple Floyd" #1098528
    You missed this little nugget:
    So there you have our breakdown of who’s allowing the pressure. You’ll realize there’s a large percentage of pressure unaccounted for, and those are due to unblocked players that come free against roll outs or on overload blitzes, etc. Our goal here, though, is to show where the responsibility lies for all plays that can be attributed.
    Hopefully you understand how that omission skews the ratio.


    Also, the QB induced pressures were not broken down but I will say that I would believe they would be high for Brett since he was hobbled by injury from the beginning of the year and also hampered by not being in sync due to him not being in camp with the team.

    I would be willing to wager that TJ and Webb certainly bumped up that ratio though and made it higher than it was with Brett on the field even in his hobbled condition.


    In the end though, posting an article that states our OL is nothing better than average is no vindication for their play. It just reinforces what we have been saying in that the OL is a liability and needs to be upgraded to be considered elite and capable of being a consistent title contender.
    Agreed PF. They are not a terrible line, but definately could use improvement. Maybe they will be better under the new scheme. We can only hope. I would like to see the TOA sign one young offensive lineman coming off his first contract to a long term big money deal as they did with Hutch.
    Why must you defend everything this FO does....to the point of making your self look like a yes man.

  6. #6
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    Quote Originally Posted by "Marrdro" #1098523
    According to PFF's charting, the Vikings had 597 passing snaps in 2010. Of those 597 passing snaps, there was pressure on the quarterback on 35.01% of those snaps. . .if that sounds like an excessive number, it's not. It actually puts the Vikings as slightly better than league average.
    According to PFF, the Minnesota Vikings had a cumulative total of 2990 offensive line snaps on passing plays in 2010, and on those snaps, the offensive line was responsible for 146 pressures allowed. So, the offensive line allowed pressure on 4.88% of the snaps that they were on the field for in passing situations. Again, this is right around the league average, placing the Vikings at fifteenth overall in that category
    There were 308 snaps, according to PFF, where Vikings' backs and tight ends or receivers stayed in to block, and they were responsible for 20 pressures on the quarterback, or 6.49% of the time.
    ." To put it bluntly, these are quarterback pressures that are caused due to the quarterback holding on to the ball too long. . .or, as PFF puts it, "the quarterback holding on to the ball too long and inviting pressure upon himself." The Vikings. . .well, the Vikings didn't fare so well in this category. And by "didn't fare so well," what I mean is "finished dead last in the NFL." So, between Brett Favre, Tarvaris Jackson, and Joe Webb, at least some of the pressure that the Vikings' offense allowed was due to quarterbacks holding on to the football too long.
    Vikings' Offensive Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressure

    Hmmmmmmmmmmm, hasn't some yutz been on here chanting something about charting games and how the OL is at or above average all the while some on here have been saying they suck.

    I think, however, that that same yutz was suprised at how well the backs and TE's graded out. He had them alot worse than these cats did.
    That Yutz was me....
    I would like to point out that I saw our pocket routinely demolished with no place to step up into. Maynot count as a pressure but it damn well destroyed the play. Funny that wasn't a problem when ole' Birk was here. Long Peterson runs? Seems like they have disappeared as well.

  7. #7
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    I was watching the top 100 players show on NFLN and they were showing highlites of Welker. One thing I noticede was how clean Brady was in the pocket. Not even a hint of pressure. He stood back there like a statue until the receiver came open, then threw the ball.
    I realize those are highlites and don't represent every play, but I've seen this same thing over the years in the few games of the Pats I've watched.

    That's the type of line I want to see. Not an average line, nor an above average line. I want a best in the league type line. The Vikings have had it before. No reason to lower our expectations just because it is the Vikings.

    So many factors play a role in a team sport that all these PPO debates trying to pin blame on a single player are a little silly.
    Sometimes the QB hangs on to the ball too long. Sometimes the receiver doesn't get open. Sometimes the line lets a rusher through the line untouched.

    It's a team sport that requires most of the members to play well and have some luck in order to find success.

    In 2009 the line played well, the QB played well, and the receivers played well.

    All three of those offensive elements suffered injuries in 2010 leading to a craptacular season with the result of the head coach getting fired.

    Hopefully we see improvement and good health for our offense this year.

    But I'm tired of seeing cast off receivers from the Bears and Eagles, patchwork QB's, and unmotivated, ou of shape, overweight, offensive linemen.

    After 50 years of support, Vikings fans have every right to expect more than mediocraty.

    Average grants me no solace.
    “What takes a quarterback to the next level is not arm strength or mobility or any of that stuff. It’s the ability to play on critical downs. Manage third downs, or red zones or four-minute or two-minute situations"
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  8. #8
    Purple Floyd's Avatar
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    Quote Originally Posted by "jargomcfargo" #1098542
    I was watching the top 100 players show on NFLN and they were showing highlites of Welker. One thing I noticede was how clean Brady was in the pocket. Not even a hint of pressure. He stood back there like a statue until the receiver came open, then threw the ball.
    I realize those are highlites and don't represent every play, but I've seen this same thing over the years in the few games of the Pats I've watched.

    That's the type of line I want to see. Not an average line, nor an above average line. I want a best in the league type line. The Vikings have had it before. No reason to lower our expectations just because it is the Vikings.

    So many factors play a role in a team sport that all these PPO debates trying to pin blame on a single player are a little silly.
    Sometimes the QB hangs on to the ball too long. Sometimes the receiver doesn't get open. Sometimes the line lets a rusher through the line untouched.

    It's a team sport that requires most of the members to play well and have some luck in order to find success.

    In 2009 the line played well, the QB played well, and the receivers played well.

    All three of those offensive elements suffered injuries in 2010 leading to a craptacular season with the result of the head coach getting fired.

    Hopefully we see improvement and good health for our offense this year.

    But I'm tired of seeing cast off receivers from the Bears and Eagles, patchwork QB's, and unmotivated, ou of shape, overweight, offensive linemen.

    After 50 years of support, Vikings fans have every right to expect more than mediocraty.

    Average grants me no solace.
    Agreed.

    It takes more than average year after year to be a contender.

  9. #9
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    Quote Originally Posted by "Purple Floyd" #1098528
    Also, the QB induced pressures were not broken down but I will say that I would believe they would be high for Brett since he was hobbled by injury from the beginning of the year and also hampered by not being in sync due to him not being in camp with the team.
    What injury was he hobbled from at the beginning of the season? He had the offseason surgery & his ankle didn't get re-injured until after the season started.

    The lack of Favre not being in sync due to him not being in camp with the team is Favres fault & no one elses. He has selfishly & purposely skipped out on training camp for several of his last NFL years.

    "If at first you don't succeed, parachuting is not for you"

  10. #10
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    Re: Off Line Actually Not Terrible At Allowing Pressur

    Quote Originally Posted by "singersp" #1098594
    Quote Originally Posted by "Purple Floyd" #1098528
    Also, the QB induced pressures were not broken down but I will say that I would believe they would be high for Brett since he was hobbled by injury from the beginning of the year and also hampered by not being in sync due to him not being in camp with the team.
    What injury was he hobbled from at the beginning of the season? He had the offseason surgery & his ankle didn't get re-injured until after the season started.

    The lack of Favre not being in sync due to him not being in camp with the team is Favres fault & no one elses. He has selfishly & purposely skipped out on training camp for several of his last NFL years.
    Nobody is arguing tha tlast bit, but you can tell just from watching he wasn't the same this year.

    He said his ankle was fine, but it wasn't. It was usable, but not like it was in 09.

    That, and his arm held him back this year. Our piss poor line and receiver play didn't help at all, but we can't completely let blame off him.

    It was a team effort to play that shitty last year. The ONLY players who seemed to show up each week was Peterson, Harvin, Kluwe, Longwell, Loeffler and Allen after about week 5. The rest was the textbook definition of inconsistent.

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