Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Prophet Guest

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    Fowler's green speaks volumes
    3 March 2005
    Page 2, ESPN

    If you're into language, the Unites States Constitution is a pretty nice read. The elegant flow of Colonial prose is captivating. Thomas Jefferson, for all his faults on the slavery issue, was a dandy wordsmith. Just the opening to the preamble is wonderful in its scope of vision and inclusiveness: "We, the people ... "

    How exactly those words and that document pertain to the modern sports world ... well, Bill Clinton said it better than I can. Before the latest Super Bowl, as he was seated next to the original President George Bush, Clinton said something to the effect that "at one time, only white male landowners had rights. Now there's no place we can't go."

    And for all of his faults on the adultery issue, Bill Clinton just might be a bona fide mystic. Turns out he's right. We, the people, really can go just about anywhere -- the latest destination being the NFL owners' boardroom.

    Thomas Jefferson and crew never actually said that only white men who owned land could have the power. Didn't have to. It was pretty well understood. Beliefs about the inferiority of black folks didn't have to be voiced, or written. It was common knowledge that, aside from impersonating mules, blacks had nothing significant to offer society. A black man wasn't even a whole human back then -- he was merely 3/5 of his white counterpart.

    Now, Reggie Fowler, a black man and whole human being, stands to become the first black owner in the history of the NFL, and he's faced with questions about his integrity. Seems not all of his résumé was nonfiction. He admitted recently that he didn't actually play for the Cincinnati Bengals in 1982, as his résumé had stated. He just went to a training camp. He did the same with the Calgary Stampeders in 1983.

    As long as Reggie Fowler has the green, the NFL will listen.
    The résumé also originally claimed that Fowler graduated with a degree in business from the University of Wyoming -- when the degree, in fact, was in social work.

    Fowler maintains that the dishonesty was intended to help him land a job.

    "Years ago, when I was looking for companies, I didn't think they wanted to hire a guy in social work," he said. "I thought they wanted to hire a guy with a business degree."

    I'm inclined to agree with him. To land a job, he had to look the part and tell the right story. And today, Fowler's story happens to be the right one.

    That all of this happened in February, during Black History Month, isn't lost on Yours Truly.

    Now, on issues pertaining to Black History Month, I'm not so moved by what things are (such as the fact that there are six black coaches in the NFL and three in college) as I am by what they mean. I'm interested in the impact a black presence among NFL owners has on the landscape.

    When it comes to issues of race in environs as exclusive as NFL ownership, most folks trade speech for a poker face. The status quo is maintained by a cool, steely glare -- one that reveals no thought and betrays no feeling. But now that Fowler is poised to enter the once-forbidden city and take a seat at his first owners' meeting, how will the other owners see him? And what does it mean?

    It means that the American dream, even in a bad economy -- especially in a bad economy -- is alive and well for anyone with loot. Fowler has taken what was once unforgivable blackness and blended it with the ever-popular green. And those colors, when successfully fused, give you ... well, they give you black. I'm fairly certain there are some owners who are less than keen on an "other" crashing the party. It's their poker game and their rules. But when a man with 625 million chips wants in, it's pretty hard to deny him access.

    That's why all the talk about falsified résumés is so baffling. This ain't about George O'Leary. It ain't about Notre Dame, or false images, or false gods. This is about power.

    Notre Dame's football coach has power, but it's power in a self-contained university capsule. O'Leary-gate was about perception. It was about what the man had really done as opposed to what appeared on the paper.

    But NFL ownership isn't based on action, it's based on possession. And a black man with $600 million has a different kind of power, a power much more vast and potentially horrible than any wielded by a football coach. He has a voice in the most popular sports league in the country. He has a seat in one of the most exclusive clubs in the country.

    He has the unfettered authority to hire black people and fire white people.

    So maybe that's why Fowler's résumé makes for such an effective weapon of mass distraction.

    Voices bring change. The more powerful the voice, the greater the possibility of change. Johnnie Cochran's involvement in the NFL's hiring practices helped bring about the "Rooney rule," whereby teams must interview minority candidates before they hire coaches. Nonetheless, as that change was taking place, one particularly shortsighted owner -- the Ravens' Art Modell -- expressed his fear and laughable ignorance with this crack: "Johnnie Cochran will have O.J. Simpson coaching my team."

    I understand the concern. As long as black faces are relegated to the field, there's no threat of change. It's the power of speech that presents the problem.

    One black assistant coach in the NFC told me: "If some prominent black players would voice a concern about the lack of black coaches, then someone might do something about it." He's right. But there's an unspoken rule at play here: As long as the money is right, athletes aren't making statements about anything.

    While we're on unspoken rules, Ed Gordon of National Public Radio mentioned one recently that applies to black folks in corporate settings. It goes like this: If there are two black people in conversation, it's a business meeting. But if there are three, then it might be perceived as a plot to overtake the power structure.

    And this brings us to Randy Moss.

    While we're awaiting Fowler's confirmation by his soon-to-be peers, there is much speculation about whether he had any say in the trade of Randy Moss to the Raiders. In the week before the deal went down, Fowler said, "No, there will be no trade of Randy Moss."

    I'm sure that sounded good to Moss fans. Nevertheless, Moss, the league's best receiver, is packing his bags and heading to Oaktown.

    Now for the past seven years, Moss has been responsible for ... oh, say 3/5 of the Vikings' success. But don't you think the joined forces of Daunte Culpepper (field leader), Moss (unshackled field hand) and Fowler (landowner) would have the power to alter the league's structure drastically? Neither the seller (Red McCombs) nor the buyer (Fowler) amassed his wealth without some common sense, so I'm sure no one had to remind either man of this.

    The unspoken rule of ownership clearly states that character is good fodder for judging on-field talent; but in the boardroom, credibility is assured only after the check clears. Once inside said room, an owner's behavior is offered for public consumption, and the consequences can be dire.

    That bell you hear ringing in the back of your mind? It's the late Marge Schott. You remember her -- the chain-smoking, racial-epithet-tossing, saucy dame who once owned the Cincinnati Reds and was all but excommunicated from baseball after she dropped a few "n" words and professed an unhealthy interest in Adolf Hitler. But old Marge's social shortcomings weren't called into question until long after she bought the team and turned herself into a one-woman public relations tragedy.

    If a few of the owners, perhaps a few fans, some media types and confessed white supremacists have a legitimate issue with Fowler, it's with his business history.

    Overseeing business interests that have been sued 36 times is no small thing, so I can understand the good folks in Minnesota being nervous about Fowler's rep.

    But Fowler already has said that, should he succeed in his bid to buy the Vikings, the team's fans will be his top priority. At a recent news conference, he told the media: "I'm excited to be here in the Twin Cities, the state of Minnesota, to let you know that we are here to, No. 1, acquire your team and hopefully put the team back into the hands of the state of Minnesota and let you know that we're committed to being here."

    What's that? You have doubts that Reggie Fowler will make good on his word?

    I can't say that I blame you.

    Those words do sound good, though.

    Alan Grant is a former NFL defensive back and the author of "Return to Glory: Inside Tyrone Willingham's Amazing First Season at Notre Dame"

    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2...e=grant/050302

    ------------------------------------

    McCombs in charge until sale approved or rejected
    3 March 2005
    Associated Press

    EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. -- With prospective buyer Reggie Fowler's offer to buy the Minnesota Vikings about to get a close look from the NFL, current owner Red McCombs said Thursday that he's confident the sale will be approved.

    "I'm making decisions as if I were to continue to be the owner of the Vikings although I fully expect that Mr. Fowler's deal will be consummated," McCombs said in a teleconference from Texas.

    McCombs said commissioner Paul Tagliabue has met with Fowler to discuss a number of issues, including Fowler's financial status and an embarrassing incident two weeks ago in which Fowler representatives distributed a biography to reporters that included several inaccuracies.

    "(Tagliabue) was very comfortable with the answers to all of that and he was very comfortable with Reggie and that the process was moving forward and making progress," McCombs said.

    The NFL's Finance Committee will meet next week to decide whether to recommend Fowler's bid to other owners. The deal would make Fowler the NFL's first black owner.

    Until the sale is approved or rejected, McCombs is running the team as he sees fit.

    The blockbuster trade that sent star receiver Randy Moss to the Oakland Raiders for linebacker Napoleon Harris, the No. 7 pick in April's draft and a seventh-round pick was completed on Wednesday, a day in which the Vikings also signed veteran defensive tackle Pat Williams of Buffalo.

    McCombs said he contacted Fowler as a courtesy several days before the Vikings agreed to trade Moss.

    "(Fowler) said, 'Thank you very much for sharing that information with me. I appreciate it very much,'" McCombs said of Fowler's reaction to the news. "There was nothing negative in his response whatsoever."

    Some people have doubted whether Fowler, who has mostly shied from media attention and revealed little about his finances, can afford the required 30 percent share of a $625 million purchase to be ownership's general partner.

    McCombs said he was confident Fowler has the money. But he said he'll take it in stride if the deal falls through.

    "I'll keep (the team) until I find somebody else to buy it," McCombs said. "If I find somebody else the next day, I'm going to sell it."

    http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2004315

  2. #2
    Del Rio Guest

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    Kind of misleading, no new info in there.

    Some of it looks as if it was written by the NAACP

  3. #3
    Prophet Guest

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    Yeah, I agree. I saw the headlines and thought it would be interesting and posted it. After I read it I realized it was just reiterating old news or going off on the NAACPish tangent.

    Personally, I have my doubts that the Fowler deal will go through due to his financial background and the apparent backing out of a few of the NY boys.

    I sure hope Redneck sells the team though, that guy is wearing on me.

  4. #4
    Del Rio Guest

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    I didn't mind reading it I was just wishing it was actually about that Fowler had the cash.

    Red is a selfish prick he needs to go soon.

  5. #5
    whackthepack is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    6,535

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    Alot of discussion in the twin cities about if he has the cash, most of what we are hearing is that nobody knows for sure.

    The numbers I hear floating around would suggest that he does not have the wealth to be the major owner. His partners on the other hand are loaded and could buy the Vikes with no problem.
    What we've got here is failure to communicate.

  6. #6
    Caine's Avatar
    Caine is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    5,135

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    "whackthepack" wrote:
    Alot of discussion in the twin cities about if he has the cash, most of what we are hearing is that nobody knows for sure.

    The numbers I hear floating around would suggest that he does not have the wealth to be the major owner. His partners on the other hand are loaded and could buy the Vikes with no problem.
    He just sold 1/4 of his company - Spiral Inc - for 300 million. Probably as an insurance policy to generate the cash to make the sale happen.

    What baffles me is if his partners are so loaded, why didn't THEY try to buy the team? No one knows WHO they are - which leaves a lot of speculation to run amok. Are they Old Mafia, retired to Jersey, with nothing better to do with their cash? I can see our future now:

    Silent Partner: "Hey, jous....c'mere. I been watching jous play, and I ain't so sure jous been given us 100% effort"

    Player: "Who the f**k are you?"

    Silent Partner: "Hey!!! Let's watch the language there, bright boy. I'm tryin to have a polite conversation here."

    Player: "Yeah? I don't care what you're trying to do...biaaatch."

    Silent Partner: "You gettin' wise? You better show some respect."

    Player: "Man, shut the f**k up before I bust your head"

    Silent Partner: "Alright, I warned jous. Pauly! Guido! Tony! C'mere. We got us a mouth."

    HEADLINE: MISSING VIKING FOUND AT THE BOTTOM OF LAKE MINNETONKA WEARING CEMENT SHOES

    Our new owners...the Sopranos.

    Caine

  7. #7
    gpete13 is offline Starter
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    196

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2003882

    Wilf, Landis, Mandelbaum avoid spotlight
    Associated Press


    MINNEAPOLIS -- They're silent partners with deep pockets.

    The three men Reggie Fowler picked as investment partners in his quest to buy the Minnesota Vikings are prosperous, longtime New York-area real estate developers who shun publicity: Zygmunt Wilf, Alan B. Landis and David Mandelbaum.

    "These people were the obvious candidates," Fowler said.

    The NFL's Finance Committee will meet next week to decide whether to recommend Fowler's deal with Vikings owner Red McCombs to all the NFL's team owners. The deal would make Fowler the NFL's first black owner.

    "I'm making decisions as if I were to continue to be the owner of the Vikings although I fully expect that Mr. Fowler's deal will be consummated," McCombs said in a teleconference from Texas.

    McCombs said commissioner Paul Tagliabue has met with Fowler to discuss a number of issues, including Fowler's financial status and an embarrassing incident two weeks ago in which Fowler representatives distributed a biography to reporters that included several inaccuracies.

    "(Tagliabue) was very comfortable with the answers to all of that and he was very comfortable with Reggie and that the process was moving forward and making progress,' McCombs said.

    In a story for Thursday's editions, the Star Tribune reported that Wilf, Landis and Mandelbaum are attractive parts of the package; their transparent wealth lends credibility to the bid from Fowler, an Arizona businessman whose own holdings and net worth have been harder to quantify.

    Under NFL rules, the general partner, who controls team operations, can own as little as 30 percent of the team.

    When Fowler announced his purchase agreement last month, worth a reported $625 million, he was the center of attention. Wilf, Landis and Mandelbaum literally stood in the background at the news conference, refusing to identify themselves to reporters.

    Wilf, Landis and Mandelbaum met Fowler sometime late last year, when he came to New York in search of partners, the Star Tribune reported. An associate of Fowler's, Detroit-area lawyer Jim Stapleton, made the connection, the report said.

    According to the Star Tribune report:


    Wilf helped build a New Jersey business from apartment rentals into a 100 percent family-owned real estate development company rated 21st-largest in the country by the Retail Traffic trade publication, the Star Tribune reported.


    He's chief operating officer of Garden Commercial Properties, based in Short Hills, N.J., a subsidiary of a company started by his father and uncle. Garden Commercial owns about 30,000 apartments in five states and Israel, according to business publications. Garden Commercial also owns more than 100 retail properties -- 21 million square feet worth -- with Wal-Mart, Home Depot, Lowe's, and Walgreens among its favored anchors.


    Landis was part-owner of the NBA's New Jersey Nets, which was bought in 1998 for $150 million and sold for $300 million last year. He's also CEO of the Landis Group, of New York City. The 560-acre Carnegie Center development near Princeton, N.J. earned him the 1991 Urban Land Institute Award for Excellence, but it nearly bankrupted him in the early 1990s in a real estate downturn.

    In 1998, Landis sold Carnegie and a New Brunswick, N.J., office tower to Boston Properties, the ninth-largest real estate investment trust (REIT) in the country, for $284 million, including $137 million in cash. The deal also brought the Landis Group $95.4 million in shares of the REIT.


    Mandelbaum is a member of the Mandelbaum & Mandelbaum law firm in New York and a partner in Interstate Properties, where he began his association with Steven Roth, leader of the Vornado REIT. Roth persuaded Mandelbaum to invest $250,000 in the formation of Interstate Properties in 1965. Now Interstate owns 8 percent of Vornado, the fourth-largest REIT in the country with a market value of $8.9 billion. Mandelbaum's holdings are worth an estimated $475 million.

    None of the three returned phone calls from the Star Tribune.

  8. #8
    ultravikingfan's Avatar
    ultravikingfan is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    24,514

    Fowler's green speaks volumes, Redneck NFL will ok sale

    "Caine" wrote:
    "whackthepack" wrote:
    Alot of discussion in the twin cities about if he has the cash, most of what we are hearing is that nobody knows for sure.

    The numbers I hear floating around would suggest that he does not have the wealth to be the major owner. His partners on the other hand are loaded and could buy the Vikes with no problem.
    He just sold 1/4 of his company - Spiral Inc - for 300 million. Probably as an insurance policy to generate the cash to make the sale happen.

    What baffles me is if his partners are so loaded, why didn't THEY try to buy the team? No one knows WHO they are - which leaves a lot of speculation to run amok. Are they Old Mafia, retired to Jersey, with nothing better to do with their cash? I can see our future now:

    Silent Partner: "Hey, jous....c'mere. I been watching jous play, and I ain't so sure jous been given us 100% effort"

    Player: "Who the f**k are you?"

    Silent Partner: "Hey!!! Let's watch the language there, bright boy. I'm tryin to have a polite conversation here."

    Player: "Yeah? I don't care what you're trying to do...biaaatch."

    Silent Partner: "You gettin' wise? You better show some respect."

    Player: "Man, shut the f**k up before I bust your head"

    Silent Partner: "Alright, I warned jous. Pauly! Guido! Tony! C'mere. We got us a mouth."

    HEADLINE: MISSING VIKING FOUND AT THE BOTTOM OF LAKE MINNETONKA WEARING CEMENT SHOES

    Our new owners...the Sopranos.

    Caine
    Once again you come through Caine! :salute:

Similar Threads

  1. SPEAKING VOLUMES
    By mark in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-02-2009, 11:50 PM
  2. Denny Green Speaks To Pepp Saga
    By singersp in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-11-2006, 08:18 AM
  3. Redneck explains sale
    By Prophet in forum Vikings Fan Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-23-2005, 12:04 AM
  4. Looks like Fowler's toast
    By ADubya26 in forum Vikings Fan Forum
    Replies: 62
    Last Post: 02-23-2005, 12:28 PM
  5. Well it looks like Reggie Fowler's deal..
    By GQVikesfan in forum Vikings Fan Forum
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 02-14-2005, 01:03 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •