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Thread: Carolina game?

  1. #11
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    Re: Carolina game?

    "WisconsinSucks" wrote:
    I haven't lived in MN for 10 years and have had DirecTV with Sunday Ticket for 8.
    Can't imagine anyone not living in MN wouldn't have it.

    Also, do people really still use VCRs?
    Get TiVo, you'll never watch commercials again.

    Yeah, it sucks living in sconnie and not having a dish. Hopefully next football season I'll have the dish so I can get the Ticket.

    I have to admit that I still use a VCR, quite often actually. We have four of them in our house. We also have 3 DVD players, but I tape things a lot on our VCRs. It's old school, but it works!

    I get the most pissed off looks from people with my VKG 4 LFE Wisconsin license plate, and I LOVE IT!!

  2. #12
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    Re: Carolina game?

    We have been working on the issue too....heres a good article.

    NFL Network Is Counting on Fans to Pay a Lot for a Little
    By Richard Sandomir
    September 19, 2006
    New York Times

    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/19/sports/football/19sandomir.html?ref=football

    The NFL Network, the television progeny of a league that knows better than all others how to mint money, is overreaching in its tough-minded campaign to prove its indispensability to fans in the cable TV universe.

    The network is overselling the value of its eight-game Thursday-and-Saturday schedule, which will not begin until Thanksgiving. It is clearly in love with what it is offering. You can tell by what it is charging.

    Basic arithmetic shows that at the rate it is demanding, at least 70 cents a subscriber every month, the NFL Network would amass $756 million in revenue if it were fully distributed to 90 million cable homes.

    That is an astonishingly steep value to place on eight games — which will be simulcast on local stations in the teams’ markets — and an array of very good studio, news and archival programs. Still, that’s 357 days without games.

    Until awarding itself the matchups, the network charged cable operators 20 cents a subscriber. It is now available in 41 million homes, two-thirds of them DirecTV and Dish Network satellite customers.

    It takes serious guts to place a huge valuation on a handful of games shown over six weeks, without playoffs, but the league has seen how its ESPN games dominate cable by attracting about 8 percent or 9 percent of the cable world, then selling advertising off that rabid fan base.

    Assuming full cable penetration, the $756 million valuation exceeds NBC, Fox, CBS or DirecTV’s average annual payments to the N.F.L., but it is less than ESPN’s $1.1 billion fee.

    •A critical difference is that all but the NFL Network carry full-season schedules. NBC has 17 games and playoffs. CBS and Fox each carry, regionally or nationally, more than 100 games divvied into 25 or 26 Sunday afternoon singleheader and doubleheader windows, in addition to the playoffs. ESPN has 17 games, but no playoff games or Super Bowls, which CBS, Fox and NBC will rotate through 2011.

    DirecTV’s Sunday Ticket satellite plan carries all 219 Sunday afternoon games to about 1.5 million subscribers for an annual payment to the league of $700 million. The N.F.L. has always sold the package exclusively to DirecTV, leaving it out of the reach of cable operators, who have long coveted it.

    Having cast its lot with DirecTV, the league wants cable operators to swallow a large fee, which would inevitably find its way to consumers.

    “To suggest that anybody’s season will be ruined for missing eight games is ludicrous,” said Fred Dressler, the executive vice president of Time Warner Cable, which is feuding with the NFL Network.

    Cable operators are required to put the NFL Network on expanded basic, where the widest swath of customers exists. One key exception is Comcast, with 24 million subscribers the largest cable operator; it signed a deal three years ago that allowed it to put the NFL Network on a digital tier available to only a third of its customers — even if the eight games were added.

    Still, there is a lively dispute over whether Comcast will eventually put the channel on a sports tier that will reduce its viewership to those willing to pay $5 or $6 a month to see it, NBA TV, CSTV and other networks.

    Sports tiers have been little-viewed flops. For the NFL Network, being on a pay-per-view tier would be a terrifying financial prospect, slashing revenue and exposing it to the habits of subscribers who might buy the tier for two months, then drop it for the rest of the year.

    “No one will ever have the right to do that,” said Seth Palansky, a network spokesman. Steve Bornstein, its president, was unavailable for comment.

    Bornstein and owners spurned a Comcast bid worth at least $400 million to carry the eight games on OLN (newly rechristened Versus). It appears clear that Bornstein is betting that he can use the N.F.L.’s power to extract well more than that from cable, satellite and telephone customers. “Our value is commensurate with the programming we’re offering,” Palansky said.

    In its tiff with Time Warner, the NFL Network is battling through an ad campaign designed to stoke the anger of cable customers. Time Warner is responding with a Web site geared to undermine the league’s position.

    •Unable to strike a deal with the league, Time Warner last week stripped the channel from systems in Buffalo, Cleveland, Dallas and Los Angeles, systems that were recently acquired from Adelphia.

    In one newspaper ad, the network cited Time Warner and Cablevision as holdouts and claimed quite hyperbolically that without it “you’ll miss the best games and the run to the playoffs.” The claim borders on deception, given how many games can be seen elsewhere and that there is no way to know how important they will be. Still, the tactics on all sides are predictable.

    Dressler, of Time Warner, said, “The NFL Network keeps the pressure on because it believes we will ultimately end up charging all our customers to satisfy the few who want these games.”

  3. #13
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    Re: Carolina game?

    "Webby" wrote:
    We have been working on the issue too....heres a good article.

    NFL Network Is Counting on Fans to Pay a Lot for a Little
    By Richard Sandomir
    September 19, 2006
    New York Times

    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/19/sports/football/19sandomir.html?ref=football

    The NFL Network, the television progeny of a league that knows better than all others how to mint money, is overreaching in its tough-minded campaign to prove its indispensability to fans in the cable TV universe.

    The network is overselling the value of its eight-game Thursday-and-Saturday schedule, which will not begin until Thanksgiving. It is clearly in love with what it is offering. You can tell by what it is charging.

    Basic arithmetic shows that at the rate it is demanding, at least 70 cents a subscriber every month, the NFL Network would amass $756 million in revenue if it were fully distributed to 90 million cable homes.

    That is an astonishingly steep value to place on eight games — which will be simulcast on local stations in the teams’ markets — and an array of very good studio, news and archival programs. Still, that’s 357 days without games.

    Until awarding itself the matchups, the network charged cable operators 20 cents a subscriber. It is now available in 41 million homes, two-thirds of them DirecTV and Dish Network satellite customers.

    It takes serious guts to place a huge valuation on a handful of games shown over six weeks, without playoffs, but the league has seen how its ESPN games dominate cable by attracting about 8 percent or 9 percent of the cable world, then selling advertising off that rabid fan base.

    Assuming full cable penetration, the $756 million valuation exceeds NBC, Fox, CBS or DirecTV’s average annual payments to the N.F.L., but it is less than ESPN’s $1.1 billion fee.

    •A critical difference is that all but the NFL Network carry full-season schedules. NBC has 17 games and playoffs. CBS and Fox each carry, regionally or nationally, more than 100 games divvied into 25 or 26 Sunday afternoon singleheader and doubleheader windows, in addition to the playoffs. ESPN has 17 games, but no playoff games or Super Bowls, which CBS, Fox and NBC will rotate through 2011.

    DirecTV’s Sunday Ticket satellite plan carries all 219 Sunday afternoon games to about 1.5 million subscribers for an annual payment to the league of $700 million. The N.F.L. has always sold the package exclusively to DirecTV, leaving it out of the reach of cable operators, who have long coveted it.

    Having cast its lot with DirecTV, the league wants cable operators to swallow a large fee, which would inevitably find its way to consumers.

    “To suggest that anybody’s season will be ruined for missing eight games is ludicrous,” said Fred Dressler, the executive vice president of Time Warner Cable, which is feuding with the NFL Network.

    Cable operators are required to put the NFL Network on expanded basic, where the widest swath of customers exists. One key exception is Comcast, with 24 million subscribers the largest cable operator; it signed a deal three years ago that allowed it to put the NFL Network on a digital tier available to only a third of its customers — even if the eight games were added.

    Still, there is a lively dispute over whether Comcast will eventually put the channel on a sports tier that will reduce its viewership to those willing to pay $5 or $6 a month to see it, NBA TV, CSTV and other networks.

    Sports tiers have been little-viewed flops. For the NFL Network, being on a pay-per-view tier would be a terrifying financial prospect, slashing revenue and exposing it to the habits of subscribers who might buy the tier for two months, then drop it for the rest of the year.

    “No one will ever have the right to do that,” said Seth Palansky, a network spokesman. Steve Bornstein, its president, was unavailable for comment.

    Bornstein and owners spurned a Comcast bid worth at least $400 million to carry the eight games on OLN (newly rechristened Versus). It appears clear that Bornstein is betting that he can use the N.F.L.’s power to extract well more than that from cable, satellite and telephone customers. “Our value is commensurate with the programming we’re offering,” Palansky said.

    In its tiff with Time Warner, the NFL Network is battling through an ad campaign designed to stoke the anger of cable customers. Time Warner is responding with a Web site geared to undermine the league’s position.

    •Unable to strike a deal with the league, Time Warner last week stripped the channel from systems in Buffalo, Cleveland, Dallas and Los Angeles, systems that were recently acquired from Adelphia.

    In one newspaper ad, the network cited Time Warner and Cablevision as holdouts and claimed quite hyperbolically that without it “you’ll miss the best games and the run to the playoffs.” The claim borders on deception, given how many games can be seen elsewhere and that there is no way to know how important they will be. Still, the tactics on all sides are predictable.

    Dressler, of Time Warner, said, “The NFL Network keeps the pressure on because it believes we will ultimately end up charging all our customers to satisfy the few who want these games.”
    I would gladly pay 70 cents a month to get that station! 8.40 a year for 24-7-365 football talk and footage is nothing!

    I get the most pissed off looks from people with my VKG 4 LFE Wisconsin license plate, and I LOVE IT!!

  4. #14
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    Re: Carolina game?

    NFL network sounds greedy in that article.
    70 cents is a ton.
    Cable Co sucks they will probably raise the rates to cover it.

  5. #15
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    Re: Carolina game?

    You really think that 70 cents is a ton? I could see if that was the cost per day or week, but to me 70 cents a month just isn't too much. We could feed a kid in Africa with that! lol jk

    I get the most pissed off looks from people with my VKG 4 LFE Wisconsin license plate, and I LOVE IT!!

  6. #16
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    Re: Carolina game?

    Still, that’s 357 days without games.
    ??? This part has me stumped.

    "If at first you don't succeed, parachuting is not for you"

  7. #17
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    Re: Carolina game?

    "singersp" wrote:
    Still, that’s 357 days without games.
    ??? This part has me stumped.
    8 +357 = one year

  8. #18
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    Re: Carolina game?

    "snowinapril" wrote:
    "singersp" wrote:
    Still, that’s 357 days without games.
    ??? This part has me stumped.
    8 +357 = one year
    LOL! I really need to get some sleep. I was thinking 357 = 1 year + 2 days.

    "If at first you don't succeed, parachuting is not for you"

  9. #19
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    Re: Carolina game?

    "VKG4LFE" wrote:
    You really think that 70 cents is a ton? I could see if that was the cost per day or week, but to me 70 cents a month just isn't too much. We could feed a kid in Africa with that! lol jk
    In comparison to other networks!
    I love the NFL Network.
    I would pay for it if I had to.


  10. #20
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    Re: Carolina game?

    "VKG4LFE" wrote:
    "WisconsinSucks" wrote:
    I haven't lived in MN for 10 years and have had DirecTV with Sunday Ticket for 8.
    Can't imagine anyone not living in MN wouldn't have it.

    Also, do people really still use VCRs?
    Get TiVo, you'll never watch commercials again.

    Yeah, it sucks living in sconnie and not having a dish. Hopefully next football season I'll have the dish so I can get the Ticket.

    I have to admit that I still use a VCR, quite often actually. We have four of them in our house. We also have 3 DVD players, but I tape things a lot on our VCRs. It's old school, but it works!
    I still enjoy using my VCR also VKG4LFE....I also enjoy watching the tape with the 3 games you sent me last year....When feeling down, and think things are unfixable, I just watch that 56 yard field goal by edinger and I feel better really fast... ;D


    I LOVE THE SMELL OF VICTORY IN THE MORNING AIR.

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