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  1. #11
    BadlandsVikings's Avatar
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    What percentage is the Luxury tax?

  2. #12
    whackthepack is offline Jersey Retired
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    I found this it gives who the teams with teh most to spend are, but the Vikes signed McKinney, K-Will and EJ Henderson after so our cap number on here is not correct.


    The league notified the clubs this week in Dallas that next year's salary cap would be $109 million, meaning the 32 teams currently have $655 million collectively to spend to max out to the $3.488 billion allocated under the cap.


    San Francisco owner John York's austerity plan has worked wonders, and the 49ers top the list with $41.78 million to spend. After years of salary-cap hell, the Tennessee Titans are next with $39.9 million under next season's cap. This is great news for Fisher, who can pursue some of the league's best free agents. There are 20 teams with about $20 million or more to spend if they choose to do so. Here are the rest of the top ten teams: 3. Buffalo $37.86 million, 4. Arizona $35.2 million, 5. Cleveland $31.9 million, 6. Minnesota $31.5 million, 7. Jacksonville $31 million, 8. Cincinnati $28.8 million, 9. Green Bay $28.36 million and 10. New England $$26.98 million.


    Before they make any cuts or re-do some salaries, the Washington Redskins have the least amount of money, $878,730. Amazingly, the Pittsburgh Steelers are next with $1.44 million of cap space.
    What we've got here is failure to communicate.

  3. #13
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    "WVV" wrote:
    What percentage is the Luxury tax?
    Not really sure to be honest with you... Will have to look that up.. I know in MLB, the Yankees get hit with the luxury tax quite often..

  4. #14
    cc21 is offline Ring of Fame
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    haha That would just suck to be Oakland.

    We better make some moves this offseason if we have that much to spend. I thought we had way less than that.

  5. #15
    BadlandsVikings's Avatar
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    "VikesfaninWis" wrote:
    "WVV" wrote:
    What percentage is the Luxury tax?
    Not really sure to be honest with you... Will have to look that up.. I know in MLB, the Yankees get hit with the luxury tax quite often..
    LOL....Do you think Steinbrenner really cares?

  6. #16
    whackthepack is offline Jersey Retired
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    "singersp" wrote:
    "VikesfaninWis" wrote:
    "singersp" wrote:
    "VikesfaninWis" wrote:
    "singersp" wrote:
    Over the salary cap
    Team

    Cap status (over)
    Indianapolis Colts

    $5.9 million
    Washington Redskins

    $4.9 million
    Again, I have to ask this question, because I still haven't received a viable answer.

    Before the season began, there were several several teams over the cap (just ask CollegeGuyJeff).

    It was said the commission makes it mandatory for the teams to get under the cap prior to the NFL season.

    Yet here we are into the playoffs & the Colts & Redskins are still operating over the cap, without any type of consequences. So much for being under the cap being mandatory.

    Why are they being allowed to do so? What penalties does the NFL impose for over the cap teams?

    It seems absolutely nothing happens to the teams that violate it.

    It seems they have allowed these two teams to operate all season long with over the cap numbers. Isn't that an unfair advantage, especially in the case of the playoff Colts?

    Singers, I believe that they operate the same way as the MLB.. In that if any team goes over the allowed salary cap, they get hit with a luxury tax that is usually a pretty high amount.. Don't quote me on that, but it might be worth looking into to see if those two teams got hit with a luxury tax this past season..
    I have never seen it mentioned anywhere during the year. Even if they get hit with the luxury tax, doesn't the league still mandate them to get under the cap?
    Usually they don't make a big fuss about teams getting hit with a luxury tax.. So it will probably have to be looked somehow.. Also, the date that they give you is the date you have to be under the salary cap or the team gets hit with a huge luxury tax.. I believe it is basically just a date to make the team realize that the luxury tax is coming..
    In other words, if a team is rich enough that it can afford to pay the luxury tax, the salary cap doesn't mean jack pooh & they could literally try to "buy" a superbowl.


    This is from ask the commish and may help.


    http://www.skinsfans.com/pcinoz/Salary%20Cap%20FAQ.htm




    Salary Cap FAQ





    1.
    How much does each team have to spend against the NFL salary cap?



    The NFL’s Salary Cap for 2007 is $109.000m.
    However, every teams salary cap figure is adjusted for LTBE incentives not earned in the previous year, or UTBE incentives earned in the previous year.
    Currently the Redskins cap number in 2007 is $109.000m.






    2.
    How is the NFL salary cap determined?



    The percentages of the league's expanded revenue pool that the players are to receive as compensation are set at 57 percent in the 2006 and 2007 seasons, 57.5 percent in 2008 and 2009 and 58 percent in 2010 and 2011. The 2012 season would be played without a salary cap



    The deal assumes that the teams collectively will outspend the cap by 2 percent per season



    That sets the "trigger points" at 59 percent of revenues in 2006 and 2007, 59.5 percent in 2008 and 2009 and 60 percent in 2010 and 2011. The cap then will automatically adjust from year to year based on whether the teams' collective spending on player compensation reaches the trigger points. If the collective spending on players surpasses the trigger point in a season, the cap automatically will adjust downward the following season. If spending fails to reach the trigger point in a season, the cap automatically will adjust upward the following season



    Thus, the deal assumes that the players will receive an average of 59.5 percent of revenues over the duration of the deal





    3.
    How does the owner’s revenue sharing agreement work?



    The highest-revenue teams to pay about $7 million apiece annually into a fund that will be distributed to low-revenue franchises.
    The revenue sharing plan agreed to in 2006 will transfer $850 million to $900 million from high-revenue teams to low-revenue clubs over the six-year span of the agreement. The top 15 revenue-generating clubs will pay into a fund that will be redistributed among low-revenue franchises. The top five teams will pay at the highest rate. The rate will decrease for Nos. 6 through 10, then decrease again for Nos. 11 through 15.



    The total amount of money redistributed under the plan includes both payments by the top revenue-producing teams and future funds that will be redirected by the league, the person familiar with the plan said. That explains the difference between the $7 million figure and the approximately $10 million per team that would be required among the top 15 clubs for the plan to redistribute $900 million over six seasons





    4.
    What are the minimum salaries that can be paid to players under the CBA?



    In 2007 the minimum salary for rookie or first-year players is $285,000; second year is $360,000; third year is $435,000; fourth year is $510,000; fifth-year through seventh year is $595,000; eighth year through 10th year is $720,000; and 11th year and longer is $820,000.





    5.
    How does a signing bonus affect the cap hit for each year of a contract?



    The amount of the signing bonus is prorated evenly over the life of the contract or to the CBA limit (in 2007 that is 6 years).
    So if a player signs a 6 year contract that includes a $6m signing bonus, $1m of the signing bonus will be allocated against the teams salary cap each contract year for accounting purposes.






    6.
    What are voidable years and how do they affect the proration of a signing bonus?



    Many contracts these days in the NFL included clauses for "voided years". These are typically incentive laden additions to contracts that will allow the player to file for Free Agency sooner if certain goals are obtained. Voidable years can be included when determining the term of years for signing bonus pro-ration. However, if the player meets the goal that voids the year or years of the contract, any amount of the signing bonus that was allocated to the voided year or years will be accelerated and added immediately to team salary. If the accelerated signing bonus puts the team over the Salary Cap, the amount that the team is over the cap will be deducted from the team’s Salary Cap for the next year. If a player can void a contract based on a “likely to be earned incentive,” and the player is on the roster at a later time, there will be no acceleration. If a contract is renegotiated to reduce the number of years of the contract, the portion of the signing bonus that has not been allocated is included in team salary at the time of the renegotiation.





    7.
    What is the basic way to come up with a players' cap figure for any given year?



    Basically a players cap figure is made up of base salary, prorated signing bonus, any likely to be earned incentives, any unlikely to be earned incentives from the previous year that were in fact earned, any roster, reporting, workout or prorated option bonuses, and any prorated restructure bonuses. The only other possible charge is from the “Deion Sanders Rule”.






    8.
    What is “Dead Cap Money”?



    Dead cap money is the part of a players salary, prorated signing bonus, other bonuses and incentives earned that count towards a teams Salary Cap even though the player is no longer on the team.






    9.
    Do all players on a teams roster count against the salary cap?



    Between the start of a league year (around March 1) and opening day only the 51 highest paid players count against the Salary Cap, even though the team could have up to 80 players on the roster at times. Prorated bonus amounts from players not on the top 51 salaries and any dead cap money also counts during this period. This is called the “Rule of 51”. From opening day until the end of the season all players on the roster (including injured reserve) and practice squad count against the cap.





    10.
    How does a basic contract restructuring work?



    The most common form of restructuring is to reduce the base salary in the year of the restructure and use the difference (or some other agreed amount) as a new signing (or restructure) bonus.
    If a player restructures his contract and gets a new signing bonus, the new signing bonus is prorated over the remaining years of the original contract and also over the extension. The allocation of the original signing bonus remains unchanged.





    11.
    How are the cap hits applied when a player is cut or traded before June 1, or after June 1?




    If a player is released before June 1 all current and future prorated signing bonuses, and any other guaranteed monies that might have been part of his contract, count against the teams Salary Cap in that year.



    If the player is released after June 1 then the unallocated signing bonus portion of the contract is split over two years.
    In the current year, that years proration counts against the Salary Cap while all future years prorated signing bonus figures count against the Salary Cap the following year.



    Before the start of the league year, a team can designate two players who will be destined for June 1 releases to spread out remaining signing bonus acceleration into the next year. To do this, teams must carry those players' cap numbers until June 1, but release them before March so they can hit free agency. After June 1, the team gets to remove the salary and take the remaining cap hit in the following year. For example, if a player has $4 million of remaining signing bonus and four years left on his contract, he can be released before March and be a free agent. After June, the team would have only the $1 million of proration on its cap that year and let $3 million be applied to the following year's cap.



    If a player is traded, irrespective of the date, all current and future prorated signing bonuses, and any other guaranteed monies that might have been part of his contract, count against the teams Salary Cap in that year.





    12.
    What is the rookie pool and how does it work?



    A team’s Salary Cap includes the Rookie Minimum Active Salary Pool as of the day of the draft for all drafted rookies. The salary for drafted rookies will stay at this amount until the player is signed, the team’s rights are relinquished through waivers, or until the Tuesday following the tenth week of the regular season if the player is unsigned.





    13.
    How does the veteran minimum salary system work?



    The system was implemented to make it less costly to retain older veterans at the minimum salary. Under this new system, the Salary Cap count for a player with four or more Credited Seasons who signs a contract will be the same as the count for a player with two Credited Seasons.



    The difference between the Salary Cap count for a qualifying contract and the stated minimum for the qualifying player's years of service will be counted as a Player Benefit and as such is not charged against the teams Salary Cap.



    What veteran contracts qualify for this system?
    A new, one year contract at the minimum signed after previous contract has expired or has been terminated.
    Additional compensation is limited to a maximum per year total of $40,000, including allocated signing bonus, roster bonus, reporting bonus and any incentives clauses.
    In 2009 this amount rises to $50,000.





    14.
    What affect do players who are restricted free agents have on the Salary Cap?



    For Restricted Free Agents (RFA), a Qualifying Offer is included in the team salary. This amount remains in team salary until the player is signed, the Qualifying Offer is withdrawn, or a “June 1 tender” is made. If the player is unsigned and the Team makes a June 1 or June 15 offer, this offer will be included in team salary until the player is signed, the team gives up their rights to the player, or until the Tuesday after the tenth week of the regular season if the player is unsigned.





    15.
    What is the “Deion Sanders Rule”?



    Basically, it means that in a contract that extends into an uncapped year, the player's combined salary, roster bonuses and reporting bonuses in all capped years must be equal to or greater than the combined prorated signing bonus allocations in the capped years.



    If the latter is greater a cap debit is applied to the players salary cap number pertaining to the difference prorated over the capped years, then credited back to the players cap number in the uncapped year(s).





    16.
    What is the “Barry Sanders Rule”?



    Due to the Salary Cap, owners are now investing a greater amount of money up front for players in the form of guaranteed signing bonuses.
    Thus, the owners must try to protect their investments by including language in the contract that calls for a player to return a portion of the signing bonus to the team if the player “fails or refuses” to practice or play with the team. In certain situations, a team will be repaid some of the signing bonus it paid to a player (i.e., a refund), or a team will fail to pay part of a signing bonus that was already allocated toward team salary.
    If this happens, the amount previously included in team salary will be added to the team’s Salary Cap in the next year.





    17.
    What is the difference between a “credited” and an “accrued” season?



    A Credited Season is any season in which a player is on one of the following lists for at least three (3) regular season or post-season games: Active List, Inactive List, Injured Reserve List, or Physically Unable to Perform List (PUP). A player will also earn a Credited Season if he is released injured and paid the equivalent of at least three (3) game checks. Weeks on the Practice Squad will not count toward a Credited Season.



    An Accrued Season is a season during which a player has been on full pay status (Active, Inactive or Injured Reserve List) for six (6) or more regular season games. However, a player who is on the Exempt Commissioner Permission List, the Reserve Physically Unable to Perform/Non Football Injury List, or the Practice Squad for any of the six (6) qualifying games will not earn an Accrued Season regardless of his pay status.
    Earning an Accrued Season entitles a player to advance through the free agency system which governs a player’s negotiating rights once his contract has expired



    What we've got here is failure to communicate.

  7. #17
    Vikes's Avatar
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    I not sure how it works but I know I read somewhere a team CANNOT be over the cap. I think it was that ask commish.

    One of the reason Minnesota is always under the cap is because we do a LOT of upfront paying.

    We just give players big bonus checks.

    Why do you think players come to Minnesota?


    To work under Red McCombs, or the 12 owners or better yet Mike Tice.

    Or Maybe it because Minnesota PAYS big bonus checks?

    Last Minnesota does a GREAT job in cap management and I hope this does not change!
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  8. #18
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    Vikes, you need your HOF staus exempt after your spelling of MINNESOTA LOL

  9. #19
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    I thought I read somewhere online in the Minnesota papers that the Vikes are currently about $23 million under the cap after the recent signings of players.
    Sure hope that's close!
    Wish John Clayton would upate his damn board!

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  10. #20
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    Re: Salary Cap Status For All NFL Teams

    I think there's a lot of confusion considering the fact that article is almost 10 months out of date. That was before the Redskins and the Colts adjusted/restructured a LOT of contracts. Needless to say we CERTAINLY don't have $30 million plus in cap room after signing McKinnie, EJ Henderson and Kevin Williams to extensions. What I'd like to see, and maybe someone can start a new thread with this, is the list of prospective Free Agents both restricted and unrestricted for this coming off-season.

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