Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Prophet Guest

    PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round

    POSTED 9:15 p.m. EST, January 15, 2006
    PFT TEN-PACK: THE DIVISIONAL ROUND
    pft.com

    Well, one out of four isn't bad.

    Actually, it's pathetic. A monkey with a glass eye could do better.

    We got one lousy game right in the divisional round, picking the Panthers to beat the Bears. Here's hoping that our ability to craft ten observations from the weekend that was will suck at least slightly less than our skills at selecting winners.

    1. Alexander Loses His Leverage.

    The 2005 season was a dream come true for Seahawks running back Shaun Alexander. In a contract year with a guarantee that the 'Hawks won't tie his hands via the franchise or transition tag, Alexander won the rushing title, set the single-season touchdown record, and hoisted the MVP hardware.

    And as Alexander was racking up those numbers and awards, the front office watched and waited, afraid that giving Alexander a huge contract would knock the chip from his shoulder pads.

    But with true free agency only weeks away, Alexander's leverage was high and rising. If he were to cap a career season with a run to Detroit, a Super Bowl win, and the Cadillac-ac-ac-ac-ac that goes with being named the game's MVP, he'd be in a position to get more coin from owner Paul Allen than he could with a ski mask, a gun, and a big white sack with a dollar sign on it.

    But after Shaun's eggshell got popped by Redskins linebacker LaVar Arrington on Saturday, a big chunk of his leverage suddenly disappeared.

    Why, you ask? Because the Seahawks proved to themselves that they really don't need him. Sure, they'd love to have him. But if he wants a market-busting contract to stay in Seattle, the powers-that-be will be more inclined to say no.

    Other teams who might have been piecing together an offer for Alexander might now be asking themselves whether his success was merely a byproduct of the Seahawks' overall performance this year, which features one of the best offensive lines in the league and a quarterback who quietly has joined the NFL's elite.

    The bottom line is that running backs inching closer and closer to the age of 30 aren't going to get $15 million or more to sign. Before Saturday, Alexander's stellar season might have persuaded one or more teams to make an exception to a trend that sees rookie running backs taken at the top of round one getting much more money than established star tailbacks can muster. Today, he's in the same predicament as guys like Edgerrin James, whose past performance will do nothing to get him paid tomorrow.

    2. Tom Brady Is Human After All.

    We were starting to think that he wasn't. We were beginning to believe that he was Touchdown (Pass) Jesus.

    Unflappable. Invincible. Unbeatable.

    That was before Saturday night, when Brady looked, for the first time ever in postseason play, like just another guy who couldn't figure out how to deal with the noise of playing on the road in January.

    He also showed that, despite his skill at sliding in the pocket away from pressure, he's got the mobility of Michael Vick . . . when he was two. And the Broncos took full advantage of it, getting bodies moving toward him faster than he could find his hot reads, forcing him into making premature throws and bad decisions.

    The worst decision of all, of course, was the throw into coverage in the corner of the end zone on third and goal with the Pats down only by four. Flushed out of the pocket by a blitz, Brady rushed the pass into a bad spot, and then could only watch as Champ Bailey took it to hizzy. Almizzy.

    Hey, we'd still rather have Brady on our team than most if not all of the other quarterbacks in the league. And the loss might drive him to come back better than ever. But for one night, and maybe in retrospect one night only, the Wizard of Oz looked a lot more like the confused old man behind the curtain.

    3. NFL Needs To Think Outside The Box.

    In a weekend that featured an inexcusable amount of bad calls (more on that later), we've spotted a glitch that can only be fixed by hiring more zebras or by exploring ideas for weaving technology into the efforts to get things right.

    We're not inclined to call the end result of the Champ Bailey interception return a bad call, although it probably was. Careful study of the replay suggests that the ball crossed the plane of the end zone before going out of bounds (which would have given the Pats a first down on their own 20), but there wasn't enough evidence to overturn the call on the field, whichever way the call might have come down.

    The bigger problem, in our view, is that the officials weren't in position to make the call, since they all were clustered at the other edge of the field at the beginning of the play. As a result, no one was in the right spot to determine whether the ball crossed the white stripe on the side of the field before or after it crossed the white stripe across the front of the end zone.

    So what can the NFL do? One option would be to hire officials who are fast enough to get down the field so that they can make the right call on plays that involve a sudden and dramatic change in field position. But since most of the guys possessing the speed to do that are, you know, pro athletes, it might be a little difficult to recruit them into a profession dominated by older men.

    Another option would be to add another official to the crew and station him at the far end of the field behind the line of scrimmage, in the event that there is a turnover and a return. (This would have helped in the detection of those three illegal blocks that fueled Nathan Vasher's 108-yard return of a missed field goal this year.)

    The cheapest option, over the long haul, would be to develop a system for detecting whether the football enters the rectangle at either end of the field. We're not sufficiently conversant with the techno-poopie to figure out what the instruments would be called, but we think that something could be put in the pylons, and something could be put in the ball, to detect whether the ball crossed the plane of the goal line.

    It's obvious to us that something needs to be done to ensure greater accuracy in the enforcement of rules when a long return of a missed field goal or turnover breaks out. Even if only a couple of plays per year raise questions in this regard, they're usually pretty big plays.

    4. More Corroboration of Chad Incident.

    Five days after we broke one of our most controversial stories ever, corroboration of our account continues to roll in -- even if credit for our work from the national media outlets has been relatively limited.

    On Saturday night's pregame show, Boomer Esiason of CBS reiterated his belief that something went down between receiver Chad Johnson and coaches Hue Jackson and Marvin Lewis during halftime of last Sunday's wild card loss to the Steelers. On Sunday, ESPN's Chris Mortensen reported on the incident as if it were fact.

    We've also gotten favorable treatment for the story in print. Mark Curnutte of The Cincinnati Enquirer recently wrote: "Though Johnson called a news conference to deny anything happened, the report has gained increasing degrees of credibility with each passing day." On Sunday, David Neal of The Miami Herald addressed the report and added that "[u]nlike most of its Internet peers and radio ramblers, profootballtalk.com has a respectable shooting percentage with rumor accuracy."

    We realize that it's easy for the untrained eye to lump us in with the cacophony of smarmy blogs and sites written by folks with no real connections to the the sports they purport to cover. But the Johnson story and its aftermath should confirm for all of the Doubting Thomi out there that we really do have a solid network of sources, and that we're not just making stuff up in the hopes of generating traffic and buzz.

    5. Worst . . . Call . . . Ever.

    We can't wait to hear what NFL director of officials Mike Pereira has to say on Total Access this week regarding the decision to overturn the fourth quarter interception by Steelers safety Troy Polamalu against the Colts, because no amount of polish can transform that turd into a Twinkie.

    It was, by far, the worst call we'd ever seen in a playoff game, and we're now convinced that the NFL must make a dramatic change to a system that should be there to correct bad calls, not wipe out good ones

    Remember, the standard is that calls get overturned only if there is indisputable visual evidence supporting a reversal. So where in the hell was the indisputable proof that the Tazmanian Devil didn't gobble up that ball like it was a chicken made out of bubble gum with a stick of dynamite in it?

    The proof wasn't there.

    So referee Pete Morelli will have a little 'splainin' to do to Pereira. And we wouldn't be surprised to see him back next year, but without a white hat.

    6. Worst . . . Hair . . . Ever.

    When we first saw Jimmy Johnson's new 'do on FOX this weekend, we assumed we'd just missed an old-fashioned noogie session between Johnson and Terry Bradshaw. But then we learned that Johnson intentionally has configured his hair that way.

    Yee-ikes.

    Maybe Johnson is longing for his Super Bowl days, so he gave his stylist a picture of himself after he took a Gatorade bath and an Emmitt Smith scalp massage 13 years ago and said, "Make me look that all the time."

    Regardless, middle aged men (and we're being charitable to Johnson with that term) aren't supposed to make fashion statements with their hair, especially in and around a testosterone-driven industry like pro football.

    What's next, Jimmy? A private screening of "Brokeback Mountain" for you and Howie?

    7. What's Next for LaVar?

    An interesting footnote to the Redskins' loss to the Seahawks is the future of linebacker LaVar Arrington. Earlier this year, it was a foregone conclusion that the 'Skins wouldn't pick up a $6.5 million roster bonus owed to Arrington later this year, especially in the wake of a nasty grievance filed by Arrington against the team in which he claimed that the organization defrauded him out of another $6.5 million roster bonus by omitting it from the final draft of the contract, which his agents (the Postons) didn't read.

    But there's reason to believe that a reconciliation is possible. There's talk that Chargers Pro Bowl linebacker Shawne Merriman is thinking about parting ways with the Postons. Merriman is an Arrington protege; indeed, the thinking is that Arrington influenced Merriman's decision to part ways with Gary Wichard after the 2005 draft. So if Merriman is thinking about making a change, it's not a major leap of logic to conclude that his mentor might be, too.

    And it might be the smartest move Arrington ever has made. Not because the Postons have done a bad job on behalf (although we believe they have), but because the grievance against the Redskins created a rift with the Redskins that will make it virtually impossible for a deal to be struck in order to permit Arrington to remain a member of the team with a more realistic cap number for 2006.

    8. Peyton Shows His Naked Butt And Rectum.

    We've long believed that Colts quarterback Peyton Manning is a big, bolted-neck phony. He says and does all the right things, for the most part, when the cameras are on and folks are watching. But it's our opinion that, in his heart, he's a spoiled brat who thinks he's better than everyone else.

    Finally, he has given us something concrete on which to base these beliefs (apart from the allegations of Jamie Ann Naughright).

    Actually, he gave us two.

    The first one came late in the third quarter of Sunday's loss to the Steelers. Facing fourth and two from their own 36 and trailing 21-3, head coach Tony Dungy sent in the punt team.

    And Manning sent them back.

    It was one of the worst examples, in pro sports history, of disregard for the office of the head coach. Dungy is the head coach, for crying out loud. Manning is the quarterback.

    Yeah, we know that most quarterbacks have the ability to call audibles. But that's part of the authority that the head coach specifically has delegated to the quarterback. No head coach ever has given the quarterback the power to decide whether to go for it on fourth down.

    In this case, Manning showed that he regards himself as bigger than the coach -- and that's a big problem.

    As one league insider explained to us on Sunday evening, too many players on that team genuinely love Dungy. And Manning blatantly violated Dungy's role. It could create serious problems in the locker room moving forward.

    The second bit of evidence came after the game, when Manning tried to explain away his inability to get the passing game going by throwing his offensive linemen under the buffet table: "I'm trying to be a good teammate here. Let's just say we had some problems with protection."

    Actually it was a slam on both the blockers and the coaching staff, since the coaches have a pretty big role in keeping the defenders out of the quarterback's face.

    "This is on a new level," one league insider said. "This guy is a selfish SOB."

    Amen.

    9. More Bad Calls.

    It really was a bad weekend for officiating. The phantom pass interference call in the Pats-Broncos game. The non-interference call in the Colts-Steelers game. The reversal of the Polamalu pick. The Bailey pick, run, and fumble.

    There were plenty of bad calls in the Panthers-Bears game, too. In the first half, Bears corner Charles Tillman pulled a blatant horse collar on Panthers receiver Drew Carter, when Carter was well out of bounds. The extra yardage likely would have resulted in a call on the next play other than a pass down the seam, which linebacker Brian Urlacher leaped and intercepted.

    And on the Bears' final offensive play the clock was at double zero before the snap. No whistle. No flag.

    But this one helped the Panthers, since the play that wasn't called dead resulted in a game-sealing interception.

    Moving forward, we think the league needs to revisit the decision to appoint full crews to postseason games. It might be a good idea to go back to the process of pasting together teams of all stars, based on how the individual officials graded out during the regular season.

    10. No Quarterback Controversy in Chicago.

    On the same day that the Bears joined the Colts as the second and third franchises to lose a division-round game at home after a bye week (the only other team with more than one loss under such circumstances is the Chiefs, with three), the one thing that likely won't come out of the loss is a quarterback controversy in Chicago.

    Yeah, Rex Grossman looked rattled and overmatched in his playoff debut. But he's still a lot better than Kyle Orton.

    It remains to be seen whether Grossman can stay healthy and get it done on a regular basis. But the job clearly is Grossman's, and the future is still relatively bright for the Bears, even though they won't go nearly as far this year as they thought they would.

  2. #2
    Prophet Guest

    Re: PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round

    8. Peyton Shows His Naked Butt And Rectum.

    We've long believed that Colts quarterback Peyton Manning is a big, bolted-neck phony. He says and does all the right things, for the most part, when the cameras are on and folks are watching. But it's our opinion that, in his heart, he's a spoiled brat who thinks he's better than everyone else.

    Finally, he has given us something concrete on which to base these beliefs (apart from the allegations of Jamie Ann Naughright).

    Actually, he gave us two.

    The first one came late in the third quarter of Sunday's loss to the Steelers. Facing fourth and two from their own 36 and trailing 21-3, head coach Tony Dungy sent in the punt team.

    And Manning sent them back.

    It was one of the worst examples, in pro sports history, of disregard for the office of the head coach. Dungy is the head coach, for crying out loud. Manning is the quarterback.

    Yeah, we know that most quarterbacks have the ability to call audibles. But that's part of the authority that the head coach specifically has delegated to the quarterback. No head coach ever has given the quarterback the power to decide whether to go for it on fourth down.

    In this case, Manning showed that he regards himself as bigger than the coach -- and that's a big problem.

    As one league insider explained to us on Sunday evening, too many players on that team genuinely love Dungy. And Manning blatantly violated Dungy's role. It could create serious problems in the locker room moving forward.

    The second bit of evidence came after the game, when Manning tried to explain away his inability to get the passing game going by throwing his offensive linemen under the buffet table: "I'm trying to be a good teammate here. Let's just say we had some problems with protection."

    Actually it was a slam on both the blockers and the coaching staff, since the coaches have a pretty big role in keeping the defenders out of the quarterback's face.

    "This is on a new level," one league insider said. "This guy is a selfish SOB."

    Amen.
    Couldn't agree more with Florio on this analysis.

  3. #3
    NordicNed is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    9,513

    Re: PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round

    Where did this PFT come from Prophet?..

    I like his writing style, and he's just about dead on , on all topics covered...

    One of the best reads I've had here in awhile......Thanks


    I LOVE THE SMELL OF VICTORY IN THE MORNING AIR.

  4. #4
    NordicNed is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    9,513

    Re: PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round

    Take that back, I have Pro Football Talk on my favorites list..

    This was a very good read, and I've enjoyed many others by him...But like so many other things in life, sometimes the stories or viewpoints there don't sit well with me, or hold much water....

    But I like this one...


    I LOVE THE SMELL OF VICTORY IN THE MORNING AIR.

  5. #5
    Prophet Guest

    Re: PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round


    page2

  6. #6
    seaniemck7's Avatar
    seaniemck7 is offline Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    1,453

    Re: PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round

    The best thing about PFT is the fact that they buck the "conventional" media opinions. Much of their thoughts, insights and humor come across as fresh as it typically is not found anywhere else.

  7. #7
    Prophet Guest

    Re: PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round

    Another 10 for the week...

    ===============================================

    POSTED 12:57 a.m. January 17. 2006
    PFT BONUS TEN-PACK: THE BEST . . . WEEKEND . . . EVER
    pft.com

    We can't quit thinking, talking, and writing about this past weekend of games. So we figured we'd put together another Ten-Pack of takes on the best quartet of divisional games we can remember.

    1. Short People Got No Reason Not To Play.

    As the NFL talking heads rave about Panthers receiver Steve Smith, one fact that gets rarely mentioned is his height, or lack thereof.

    Listed at five feet, nine inches, Smith is one of the shortest players in the league. But he's nevertheless having a huge impact on the postseason.

    Smith is virtually unstoppable, and he's playing right now as well as any receiver in the history of the game.

    Meanwhile, much taller receivers like T.O. and Randy Moss are surely scratching their heads at the exploits of the biggest little man to hit North Carolina since Muggsy Bogues.

    One guy who'll benefit significantly from Smith's performance this season is former Colorado receiver Jeremy Bloom, another five-nine dynamo who's profile likely will skyrocket when the Olympics get started next month. If Bloom can couple a gold-medal performance in Turin with a blazing 40-yard dash in Indy, agent Gary Wichard will work relentlessly to get folks around the NFL to start thinking of Bloom as a far more marketable version of Smith.

    2. Hartings Is A Hero, Too.

    While Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger is getting plenty of praise for his game-saving tackle of Colts cornerback Nick Harper, one guy who also should be getting an "attaboy" or two is center Jeff Hartings.

    It was Hartings who broke from the scrum of linemen and made a dive at the bouncing ball that had been coughed up by the Bus. Though Hartings didn't come up with it, he landed in Harper's path, slowing Harper's initial acceleration and forcing him toward the right side of the field.

    As a result, Harper didn't have enough of a lead on the players chasing him to slow down and put a move on Roethlisberger, and Harper likewise didn't have enough room to sprint away from Roethlisberger to the left sideline.

    If, of course, the Steelers don't beat the Broncos in Denver this season, some Steelers fans might secretly wish that Harper hadn't been stopped. If the Colts had won that game off of an uncharacteristic Jerome Bettis fumble, there's no way that Bettis would have retired.

    3. Steelers, Broncos Have A History.

    Sunday's AFC title game will be the sixth postseason meeting between the Broncos and Steelers. Denver has won three, Pittsburgh has won two. Four times, the winner of their postseason slugfest has ended up in the Super Bowl.

    This time, as in 1997, it's guaranteed that the victor heads to the game with the Roman numerals.

    But the teams have only met once in the postseason under Coaches Teflon and Chin, with the Broncos stealing the 1997 AFC title at Three Rivers Stadium.

    So what happens this time around? At this point, it's too close to call.

    Maybe they'll end up playing beyond the final gun -- just like they did in 1972, when the Steelers and Broncos played to the first regular-season overtime tie in league history, 35-35.

    4. Panthers, 'Hawks Don't.

    In contrast, the Seahawks and Panthers have crossed paths only twice since Carolina entered the league in 1995. The Panthers won 26-3 at home in 2000, and the Seahawks won 23-17 at home a year ago.

    Still, we've got a feeling that this game could be a modern-day version of those Cowboys-49ers postseason contests from the early 1990s. Both teams have their nuclei in place, and both could be back in this situation in the coming years.

    For now, we're leaning toward Carolina. The Seahawks will load up against Steve Smith, forcing the Panthers to beat them either by running the ball with Nick Goings or by throwing it to other receivers.

    Goings, however, isn't some slappy signed from the practice squad. He's been with the team five years, and he rushed for 821 yards in 2004 when both Stephen Davis and DeShaun Foster were out with injury. If the Seahawks keep a safety out of the box, Goings is good enough to get sprung.

    5. Bears Defense Overrated.

    Just as the Carolina offense was shredding the Chicago defense for 29 points, a league source was opining to us that the Bears defense is grossly overrated.

    "People talk about them being one of the best ever," the source said. "They're not even the best defense in the playoffs."

    We predict for both the Bears and the Colts a tough time in 2006. With the fruits of a long season of hard labor squandered in sixty minutes of play, we think it will be very hard for both teams -- and specifically for the Bears -- to put together a season that will net them another high seed in the playoffs.

    And as teams like the Steelers and Panthers are proving this year, maybe the whole "peaking at the right time" thing includes authoring a regular season that requires the team to go for the win as the weeks wind down. Even one game of coasting can be dangerous for a squad that will sit at home as its initial playoff opponent harvests a heaping helping of confidence during wild card weekend.

    6. He Who Scores The First Touchdown Wins.

    In all four of the divisional round games, the road team scored first. The difference is that the Redskins and Pats scored field goals in the second quarter -- the Steelers and Panthers scored touchdowns on their first drives.

    It's a great way to put the home team on its heels. Take a seven-point lead, and turn the defensive dogs loose. Build the bulge to more than ten, and hang on.

    It's the best way to take the home crowd out of the game. Even if they get back into it, they never seem to be as loud as they otherwise would be if the home team was winning.

    7. We're No Dumber Than Dr. Z.

    As we continue to lick the wounds of a 1-3 weekend, we noticed that SI's Paul Zimmerman managed the same miserable outcome as us.

    We picked the Redskins, Pats, Colts, and Panthers.

    Dr. Z picked the Seahawks, Pats, Colts, and Bears.

    The Bears? What a moron.

    8. Best . . . Playoff Games . . . Ever.

    With all the buzz regarding the excellent quartet of playoff games from this past weekend, including a contest for the ages in Indy, we decided to put together our own list of the top non-Super Bowl postseason games since the merger.

    Here are the 20 best, in chronological order:

    Chiefs-Dolphins, 1971: Chiefs running back Ed Podolak's 350 all-purpose yards are a footnote to the longest game in NFL history, won by the Dolphins more than 22 minutes into overtime, 27-24.

    Raiders-Steelers, 1972: Immaculate Reception.

    Raiders-Dolphins, 1974: Oakland quarterback Ken Stabler chucks a last second touchdown pass while falling down to running back Clarence Davis to beat Miami 28-26, ending the reign of the two-time defending Super Bowl champs.

    Cowboys-Vikings, 1975: Hail Mary.

    Raiders-Colts, 1977: Oakland snuffs out Bert Jones' Colts with a double-overtime thriller, 37-31.

    Chargers-Dolphins, 1981: "I've never felt so close to death before," said San Diego tight end Kellen Winslow after a 73-minute roller-coaster ride on a humid Miami late afternoon/evening, which the Chargers won, 41-38 (his son would say the same thing 24 years later after a motorcycle ride).

    Cowboys-49ers, 1981: The Catch.

    Broncos-Browns, 1986: The Drive.

    Broncos-Browns, 1987: The Fumble.

    Vikings-49ers, 1987: Minnesota receiver Anthony Carter makes like Steve Smith in one of the biggest postseason upsets in league history, 36-24.

    Oilers-Bills, 1992: The Run-'N'-Shoot dies a sudden death as Houston proves that it's the perfect offense . . . for blowing a huge lead.

    Colts-Steelers, 1995: Jim Harbaugh's last-second rainbow almost delivers the greatest moment in NFL history.

    Jaguars-Broncos, 1996: The upstart Jags upend the heavily favored Broncos in Mile High in the last game for the old orange-and-blue unis.

    Vikings-Giants, 1997: Minnesota coach Dennis Green saves his job with an uncanny late-game comeback win on the road.

    Falcons-Vikings, 1998: Vikings kicker Gary Anderson misses his first kick of the season to prevent 16-1 Minnesota from taking a 10-point lead late; the Falcons rally to force overtime and then take the game on a fifth-quarter field goal, 30-27.

    Rams-Buccaneers, 1999: The Greatest Show on Turf hits a pothole en route to the Super Bowl, scoring only 11 points.

    Patriots-Raiders, 2001: "What in the f--k is the tuck rule?"

    Giants-49ers, 2002: San Fran erases a 24-point deficit, and then holds on thanks to a bad snap and a close call on the ensuing pass.

    Packers-Eagles, 2003: Fourth-and-26.

    Patriots-Broncos, 2005: End of an era or a temporary detour?

    Steelers-Colts, 2005: Marred by bad officiating, but still one of the best ever.

    9. Our Weekly Michael Irvin Complaint.

    During his regular appearance on the Dan Patrick radio show, the Playmaker dressed down Patrick and Keith Olbermann for poking fun at Daniell Harper's claim that she accidentally stabbed her husband, Nick, with a knife. Spouting off about "generational curses" and other such nonsense, Irvin said that there's nothing funny about a woman putting a blade into her man's kneecap.

    But then Irvin talked about his efforts to force his son to become a star athlete, yukking it up as he compared himself to Joe Jackson.

    This guy Irvin really is a piece of crap. He says what he wants and does what he wants and ignores any apparent inconsistencies. We haven't heard whether ESPN has extended his contract beyond the current season, but we're keeping our fingers crossed that we won't have to listen to the Playmaker in 2006 or beyond.

    10. NFL Admits Error.

    Hours after describing referee Pete Morelli's reversal of Troy Polamalu's interception a "judgment call," the NFL acknowledged that Morelli simply got it wrong.

    Good for the NFL. Pete, it was nice knowin' ya.

    We wonder, though, whether the NFL would have been so candid if the Colts had won the game (or, more importantly, if they'd ultimately covered the spread). Somehow, we don't think so.

    We also were pleasantly surprised to hear the guys on Sirius NFL Radio openly bitching about the bad calls from the past weekend. Although there's an apparent double standard at play, since the league owns the radio network and the league otherwise forbids team officials from second-guessing the game officials, it's good to know that the NFL isn't using its private airwaves as an overt propaganda tool.

  8. #8
    collegeguyjeff's Avatar
    collegeguyjeff is offline Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,304

    Re: PFT TEN-PACK: The Divisional Round

    manning is a punk and hopefully more people start realizing this
    I don t buy Wisconsin cheese.

Similar Threads

  1. 10-Pack: Ten biggest first-round draft busts of the last 20 years.
    By Prophet in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-01-2009, 09:02 AM
  2. Fin's Jason Taylor to the Pack for a 2nd & 4th round pick?
    By singersp in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 03-16-2008, 10:58 AM
  3. Burning questions for the divisional round
    By Prophet in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-12-2007, 08:52 AM
  4. PFT Ten-pack: The Wild Card Round
    By Prophet in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-09-2006, 06:12 PM
  5. Shockzilla's Trivia Question - Divisional Round Edition
    By shockzilla in forum Vikings Fan Forum
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-12-2005, 09:52 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •