Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    singersp's Avatar
    singersp is offline PPO Newshound
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    52,204

    Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    From USA Today;

    [size=18px]Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message [/size]

    Updated 6/21/2006 10:47 AM ET

    It is only June, but the Bengals lead the NFL.
    In arrests. Unofficially, of course.

    Actually, if you don't include Chris "Oh, No" Henry, Cincinnati isn't much of a factor in the police-blotter standings. He has been arrested four times in the last seven months and charged with driving under the influence, drug possession and carrying a concealed weapon. The only other Bengal arrested this month was rookie linebacker A.J. Nicholson (burglary, grand theft and vandalism).

    I'm not sure if the Bengals are preparing for training camp next month or auditioning players for Cops. Coach Marvin Lewis certainly changed the culture when he took command. He brought organization, respect and discipline. But it appears he may have not always drafted wisely in an area scrutinized with greater detail than ever: character.

    More likely, he took a chance. That would make him no different than every other coach. To be fair, NFL coaches inherit players who already have been passed through the system when it comes to accountability — by schools, courts and, yes, parents and legal guardians. Then they're asked to fix them.

    They're lucky if they can merely contain them.

    Now if there is one thing coaches covet more than flat-out ability, it is a player with an edgy attitude. Someone who will stick his nose in it.

    Guys such as Ricky Manning.

    Two months ago, on the day after being arrested and charged with assault by means to likely produce great bodily injury, the defensive back was signed to a $21 million offer sheet by the Chicago Bears. Manning, who is free on $30,000 bail, already was on probation.

    The offseason rap sheet (cue Bad Boys theme song) looks longer than the summer solstice, though certainly all players deserve presumption of innocence.

    Santonio Holmes hasn't played a down in the NFL, and already the Pittsburgh receiver has racked up two arrests in the last three weeks, including charges of domestic violence and simple assault.

    Reuben Droughns, fresh off a not-guilty verdict in a DUI trial, spent a night in jail last month after the Cleveland Browns running back was arrested for allegedly throwing his wife out the door (literally).

    Jake Plummer, Denver's quarterback, was cited for kicking the headlight of a pickup, then backing his vehicle into the man's truck.

    Cory Rodgers, a Green Bay rookie, was arrested after police say he fired two shots into the air during a scuffle. The rumble began, police said, after he refused to sign autographs or buy drinks for patrons.

    These guys don't need minicamps, they need maximum lessons in one school of thought: It is a privilege — not a right — to play perk-filled professional football.

    They are blowing it, and the chance for a better life as members of communities that not only look up to them, but worship their presence. (Of course, that is part of the problem.) All they have to do is keep their noses clean and they're set for life, provided they remain injury-free and stay out of the hoosegow.

    For every offending player, every thug, there are dozens of law-abiding players who are stand-up citizens. It is a minority who don't get it, though the perception remains that the NFL has a growing problem with hoodlums in helmets. It only takes a few poster boys of ill behavior to give the collective lot a bad rep.

    The league does have a conduct policy, but because of the collective bargaining agreement, issues involving discipline aren't always clear-cut. Teams wait for the legal process to be completed. Later, players often issue statements of remorse.

    That's what Minnesota's Fred Smoot and Bryant McKinnie did after pleading guilty to misdemeanor charges of disorderly conduct and being a public nuisance on a watercraft. Smoot was charged with using a sex toy in front of the crew; McKinnie was accused of performing oral sex. They were fined $1,000 each and given community service. The league can further fine them, but no suspensions are forthcoming.

    They need a bolder message, one they should have heard years ago, and the kind Mike Giuliani of Simi Valley, Calif., gave his son.

    Joe Giuliani is a redshirt freshman linebacker at Utah. He faces a charge of misdemeanor assault for allegedly using a deadly weapon — a golf club — to hit a player from a rival high school during a brawl.

    His father wanted to show him he cares. According to the Los Angeles Daily News, he let Joe sit in jail.

    For three days.

    Think the kid got the message?

    E-mail Jon Saraceno at [email protected]
    Posted 6/20/2006 11:25 PM ET
    Updated 6/21/2006 10:47 AM ET


    Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    "If at first you don't succeed, parachuting is not for you"

  2. #2
    BadlandsVikings's Avatar
    BadlandsVikings is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    26,564

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    It looks like NFL players are just high paid criminals.

  3. #3
    jdvike's Avatar
    jdvike is offline Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,440

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    Hoodlums in helmets LOL...sounds like a great name for the next NFL franchise.
    They could have a logo like HnH.
    I can see it now.....you can't play on the HnH team unless you have a rap sheet at least 2 feet long.

    hey....it could happen :wink:

  4. #4
    Del Rio Guest

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    A lot of these guys have never worked a day in thier lives. They probably have only known football.

    Now they are rich and lack responsibility. What do you expect.

  5. #5
    singersp's Avatar
    singersp is offline PPO Newshound
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    52,204

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    "Del Rio" wrote:
    A lot of these guys have never worked a day in thier lives. They probably have only known football.

    Now they are rich and lack responsibility. What do you expect.
    Exactly! What many people fail to realize is that these are not mature adults for the most part.

    These are still very young adults, mainly in there early 20's. Fresh or newly out of college that have never had much responsibility in their lives & are suddenly handed millions of dollars to play football.

    They are like kids in a candy store, except they have the means to buy all the candy they want.

    I have more admiration & respect for others their same age & even younger, who risk their lives for the freedom of this country.

    "If at first you don't succeed, parachuting is not for you"

  6. #6
    Zeus's Avatar
    Zeus is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Minnesota.
    Posts
    23,937

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    "singersp" wrote:
    "Del Rio" wrote:
    A lot of these guys have never worked a day in thier lives. They probably have only known football.

    Now they are rich and lack responsibility. What do you expect.
    Exactly! What many people fail to realize is that these are not mature adults for the most part.
    Tough to learn respect and gain maturity when every adult you've known since you were 12 was ki$$ing your butt because you could tackle or had speed or could throw or catch a ball.

    It's no excuse, of course, but somewhere some place along the line each one of them needs to be shown examples of the wrong way to do things and the right way to do things.

    =Z=

    Thanks to Josdin for the awesome sig!

  7. #7
    Del Rio Guest

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    "singersp" wrote:
    "Del Rio" wrote:
    A lot of these guys have never worked a day in thier lives. They probably have only known football.

    Now they are rich and lack responsibility. What do you expect.
    Exactly! What many people fail to realize is that these are not mature adults for the most part.

    These are still very young adults, mainly in there early 20's. Fresh or newly out of college that have never had much responsibility in their lives & are suddenly handed millions of dollars to play football.

    They are like kids in a candy store, except they have the means to buy all the candy they want.

    I have more admiration & respect for others their same age & even younger, who risk their lives for the freedom of this country.
    I agree.

    A lot of it depends on the players parents. The thing is even if you have a coal miner for a father, once he see's you have a skill that may let you break free of the labor field, once he see's you have a chance to make it big most of the time he will nurture that and make exceptions.

    Alot of these guys are not allowed to work in college. If they do work it is work-study and those jobs are a joke.

    If they are in the NFL you can bet your ass they were the star in HS. The fame, the popularity, and parents feed it.

    Then onto college on a scholorship or half pay, they are a big name, everyone knows them by the end of season one. Teachers bend the rules, girls gone wild.....the idea starts to form of going pro. Football camps.....driving as hard as possible to make it in the NFL.

    Then they get there, all they have known is popularity, fame, and success. Then you throw an assload of money at them and say you made it buddy. Your a success.

    That is why the NFL started the mentor program, and hopefully in a few years it will make a difference.

    Obviously that is not the truth for everyone, but a lot of people it is.

  8. #8
    COJOMAY is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    7,005

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    Kinda aside but I went to a Lexington (Kentucky) Legends baseball game the other day and got to talking to some of the management before the game. This is a Class C ballclub, the first rung on the ladder to the majors. I was asking the business manager about their pay status. He said every guy on the team was making an average of $3000 to $4000 per season (That's for about three months). They have to pay for their own apartments and meals except when they are on the road. The only "extra" pay they get is when they hit a home run or pitch a shutout then they pass a hat to the fans in the stands and may collect about $100 which is theirs to keep.
    So these players have a tough time making ends meet. They work hard to fulfill their dream and when they make the majors they appreciate it more. Maybe the NFL should institute some kind of "farm system" until these players grow up a bit.
    I know, it will never happen.
    Kentucky Vikes Fan

    When you require nothing, you get nothing; when you expect nothing, you will find nothing; when you embrace nothing, all you will have is nothing.

  9. #9
    Del Rio Guest

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    "COJOMAY" wrote:
    Kinda aside but I went to a Lexington (Kentucky) Legends baseball game the other day and got to talking to some of the management before the game. This is a Class C ballclub, the first rung on the ladder to the majors. I was asking the business manager about their pay status. He said every guy on the team was making an average of $3000 to $4000 per season (That's for about three months). They have to pay for their own apartments and meals except when they are on the road. The only "extra" pay they get is when they hit a home run or pitch a shutout then they pass a hat to the fans in the stands and may collect about $100 which is theirs to keep.
    So these players have a tough time making ends meet. They work hard to fulfill their dream and when they make the majors they appreciate it more. Maybe the NFL should institute some kind of "farm system" until these players grow up a bit.
    I know, it will never happen.
    I imagine baseball is very physical.

    Football makes it's money on contact. The NFL would never risk a young prospect to a minor league when his shelf life is probably less then 10 years.

    Your right though. The guys that come from the Europe league or even the CFL, have far less problems then the guys right out of college. That is because of exactly what you described.

  10. #10
    COJOMAY is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    7,005

    Re: Latest flurry of NFL arrests sends bad message

    Didn't think of the physical aspect Del. Thanks for reminding me!
    Kentucky Vikes Fan

    When you require nothing, you get nothing; when you expect nothing, you will find nothing; when you embrace nothing, all you will have is nothing.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Policeman arrests boy for having sex with daughter
    By BadlandsVikings in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-02-2010, 01:00 AM
  2. Winners and losers: Favre sends a message
    By marstc09 in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-30-2008, 06:09 AM
  3. Farmer sends message to neighbors with car fence
    By BadlandsVikings in forum The Clubhouse
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-05-2008, 10:09 AM
  4. Palmer: Arrests have got to stop.
    By Zeus in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-03-2007, 01:30 PM
  5. Message to all message board users-NFL information Insider
    By KFANreporter in forum Vikings Fan Forum
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-12-2005, 05:18 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •