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  1. #1
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    Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee

    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/200....ap/index.html

    [size=12pt]Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee[/size]
    Posted: Wednesday October 28, 2009 10:25PM; Updated: Thursday October 29, 2009 2:40AM

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- NFL commissioner Roger Goodell did not acknowledge a connection between head injuries on the football field and later brain diseases while defending the league's policies on concussions before Congress on Wednesday.

    That frustrated several members of the House Judiciary Committee, including the committee chairman, Michigan Democrat John Conyers, when Goodell told him the NFL isn't waiting for that debate to play out and is taking steps to make the game safer.

    "I just asked you a simple question. What is the answer?" persisted Conyers.

    Goodell replied by saying a medical expert could give a better answer than he could. But some House members complained later that Dr. Ira Casson, chairman of the NFL's committee on concussions, had not testified.
    Generally speaking, I think Goodell (and Tagliabue and Rozelle before him) have done a good job as commissioner.
    But that's crap.
    A 5-year-old knows that banging your head on something hurts you.

    =Z=

    Thanks to Josdin for the awesome sig!

  2. #2
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    Re: Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee

    [size=13pt]Goodell faces grilling by Congress[/size]

    NFL commissioner Roger Goodell would not acknowledge a connection between head injuries on the football field and later brain diseases while defending the league's policies on concussions before Congress.

    "If at first you don't succeed, parachuting is not for you"

  3. #3
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    Re: Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee

    "Zeus" wrote:
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/200....ap/index.html

    [size=12pt]Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee[/size]
    Posted: Wednesday October 28, 2009 10:25PM; Updated: Thursday October 29, 2009 2:40AM

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- NFL commissioner Roger Goodell did not acknowledge a connection between head injuries on the football field and later brain diseases while defending the league's policies on concussions before Congress on Wednesday.

    That frustrated several members of the House Judiciary Committee, including the committee chairman, Michigan Democrat John Conyers, when Goodell told him the NFL isn't waiting for that debate to play out and is taking steps to make the game safer.

    "I just asked you a simple question. What is the answer?" persisted Conyers.

    Goodell replied by saying a medical expert could give a better answer than he could. But some House members complained later that Dr. Ira Casson, chairman of the NFL's committee on concussions, had not testified.
    Generally speaking, I think Goodell (and Tagliabue and Rozelle before him) have done a good job as commissioner.
    But that's crap.
    A 5-year-old knows that banging your head on something hurts you.

    =Z=
    Disagree with the sentiment.


    Goodell would be irresponsible to answer a medical question publicly, particularly before congress, if the league has not taken a position based on hard research.
    It's one thing to say that hitting your head hurts you, or that players get concussions.
    It is another step to say that those hits are related to brain diseases that manifest years later.

    Obviously the NFL suspects there is (or at least could be) a connection, or they wouldn't be doing studies and 'taking steps to make the game safer.'
    I think most of us suspect this as well, and based on the article many in congress have already made up their minds.

    But I'm trying to think of a good analogy and maybe this is it:

    Imagine you have sex with a girl and about 9 months later she has a kid.
    She tells you it's yours.
    The doctor or a social worker or whatever asks you if the kid is yours.
    What do you say?
    It's probably yours.
    Seems reasonable, everything lines up.
    But do you really know that she wasn't also having sex with someone else?
    Might it be better to wait for paternity test results in some cases, rather than answering what you think?

    Could be that the NFL does have sufficient information and the studies are sufficiently clear that they do know there is a connection.
    Then maybe the smoking industry comparison some offered in the article is correct.
    But I don't know if that's true or not.
    When the age of the Vikings came to a close, they must have sensed it. Probably, they gathered together one evening, slapped each other on the back and said, "Hey, good job." - Jack Handey [Deep Thoughts]

  4. #4
    Zeus's Avatar
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    Re: Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee

    "Overlord" wrote:
    "Zeus" wrote:
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/200....ap/index.html

    [size=12pt]Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee[/size]
    Posted: Wednesday October 28, 2009 10:25PM; Updated: Thursday October 29, 2009 2:40AM

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- NFL commissioner Roger Goodell did not acknowledge a connection between head injuries on the football field and later brain diseases while defending the league's policies on concussions before Congress on Wednesday.

    That frustrated several members of the House Judiciary Committee, including the committee chairman, Michigan Democrat John Conyers, when Goodell told him the NFL isn't waiting for that debate to play out and is taking steps to make the game safer.

    "I just asked you a simple question. What is the answer?" persisted Conyers.

    Goodell replied by saying a medical expert could give a better answer than he could. But some House members complained later that Dr. Ira Casson, chairman of the NFL's committee on concussions, had not testified.
    Generally speaking, I think Goodell (and Tagliabue and Rozelle before him) have done a good job as commissioner.
    But that's crap.
    A 5-year-old knows that banging your head on something hurts you.

    =Z=
    Disagree with the sentiment.


    Goodell would be irresponsible to answer a medical question publicly, particularly before congress, if the league has not taken a position based on hard research.
    It's one thing to say that hitting your head hurts you, or that players get concussions.
    It is another step to say that those hits are related to brain diseases that manifest years later.

    Obviously the NFL suspects there is (or at least could be) a connection, or they wouldn't be doing studies and 'taking steps to make the game safer.'
    I think most of us suspect this as well, and based on the article many in congress have already made up their minds.

    But I'm trying to think of a good analogy and maybe this is it:

    Imagine you have sex with a girl and about 9 months later she has a kid.
    She tells you it's yours.
    The doctor or a social worker or whatever asks you if the kid is yours.
    What do you say?
    It's probably yours.
    Seems reasonable, everything lines up.
    But do you really know that she wasn't also having sex with someone else?
    Might it be better to wait for paternity test results in some cases, rather than answering what you think?

    Could be that the NFL does have sufficient information and the studies are sufficiently clear that they do know there is a connection.
    Then maybe the smoking industry comparison some offered in the article is correct.
    But I don't know if that's true or not.
    Here's a really really good article that explains how the NFL is trying to minimize an issue that many outside (read: Not Paid by the NFL) experts have highlighted:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/27/sp...pagewanted=all

    [size=12pt]N.F.L.’s Dementia Study Has Flaws, Experts Say [/size]
    ALAN SCHWARZ
    Published: October 26, 2009

    The N.F.L. and its doctors have consistently dismissed independent studies showing unusual cognitive decline in former players. They insist that a long-term study by the league’s committee on concussions, expected to be published in several years, will be the authoritative analysis.

    But that study is fraught with statistical, systemic and conflict-of-interest problems that make it inappropriate to examine the issue, according to many experts in epidemiology, dementia and health policy who assessed the study’s design. Another voice belonged to a member of the House Judiciary Committee, which will hold a hearing on football brain injuries Wednesday.

    “Hey, why don’t we let tobacco companies determine whether smoking is bad for your health or not?” said Representative Linda T. Sanchez, Democrat of California and a member of the Judiciary Committee. “It’s a very appropriate metaphor.”
    Lots more in that article worth noting.

    =Z=

    Thanks to Josdin for the awesome sig!

  5. #5
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    Re: Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee

    Really, really nice 1st person account from a former NFL player here:

    http://deadspin.com/5392883/messing-...players-lament

    With the brains of football players now a matter of national concern, writer Michael Oriard, a former Chiefs offensive lineman and a cultural historian, worries about both his own fate and the NFL's.

    A few weeks ago I was asked to comment on Carson Palmer's remark that, sooner or later, someone was going to die on a football field. I repeated then what I have figured out over many years of reading and writing about football: that the threat of serious injury has always been fundamental to football's appeal. It makes the players' risks and thus their courage real, their athletic skills immensely more impressive. Each season sees football fatalities, but rarely in the NFL and never on the field due to a blow. The last person to die in an NFL game was Detroit's Chuck Hughes in 1971, but from a heart attack, not a violent collision — coincidentally four days before my Kansas City Chiefs played the Lions on Thanksgiving Day. I still remember the eerie feeling, as I trotted onto the field, knowing that someone had died there just a few days earlier.

    Though rare, sudden violent death has always been a possibility in football. Research is now suggesting that the accumulation of little hits can be as dangerous as big ones, with death coming in slow-motion, after years of dementia, rather than suddenly. And everyone who played may be at risk, not just the extreme cases whose grisly stories make for sensational reading.

    The occasional tale of a Mike Webster or John Mackey has always grabbed me, but it has also always seemed an extreme case. The recent deluge of reports on the research on the brains of former NFL players feels altogether different. Malcolm Gladwell's comparison of football to dogfighting in The New Yorker didn't jolt me — that bit of melodrama was for rhetorical effect. The grisly accounts of the final days and later autopsies on Webster, Terry Long, Justin Strzelczyk, and more than a dozen others were more jolting, their cumulative effect overwhelming. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), of which I'd never heard until a few weeks ago, suddenly seemed the NFL's version of the Black Death.
    =Z=

    Thanks to Josdin for the awesome sig!

  6. #6
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    Re: Goodell defends NFL efforts on concussions to House committee

    Child please

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