Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    singersp's Avatar
    singersp is offline PPO Newshound
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    52,266

    Art of the draft deal

    [size=18px]Art of the draft deal[/size]

    By Gil Brandt
    NFL.com Senior Analyst


    (March 27, 2006) -- What goes around in the NFL does not always come around. That axiom, however, is true in the case of quarterbacks Rich Gannon and Brad Johnson.

    In 1987, the Patriots and Raiders made a multi-pick trade on draft day in which New England moved down to get the Raiders' fourth-round pick. The Patriots used that pick to draft Gannon ... who eventually made his way to the Raiders and led them to Super Bowl XXXVII. (The Raiders, by the way, used the third-round pick they got from New England that year to select Penn State running back Steve Smith.)

    Eventually, that 1992 trade involving Brad Johnson benefited the Bucs AND Vikings.

    In 1992, Tampa Bay thought nothing of sending Minnesota its ninth-round draft choice in exchange for veteran linebacker Jimmy Williams. The Vikings used that late-round pick to select Johnson, who would later find his way to Tampa Bay in time to help them win Super Bowl XXXVII. Johnson returned to the Vikings in 2005 and should be the Week 1 starter in 2006.

    These quirks of draft history prove one thing: Teams never know exactly what they're getting into when they trade draft picks. Still, that doesn't stop them from trying to make it as exact a science as possible.

    The art of draft-day trades has evolved over the years. At the 1961 draft, it was as simple as 49ers coach Red Hickey walking over to the Colts table at the hotel ballroom where the draft was being held. "I'll give you one of our tight ends, Monty Stickles or Dee Mackey, in exchange for your first-round pick," Hickey proposed to Colts head coach Weeb Ewbank. In a matter of 10 minutes, Ewbank decided he'd take Mackey, and the deal was done. Hickey calmly walked back to the 49ers' table and then used the acquired draft pick to select quarterback Billy Kilmer.


    Gil Brandt, center, was well prepared when Tampa Bay didn't take Tony Dorsett, right, in 1977.
    That's the way most draft-day deals were done back then. Eventually, teams began to map their strategies well in advance. In 1977, for instance, when I was with the Dallas Cowboys, we and the Seattle Seahawks had worked out a deal for the second overall pick as early as 10 days before the draft. But it was contingent on the player we wanted -- Tony Dorsett -- being available. We were pretty sure the Buccaneers were going to take running back Ricky Bell with the first pick, but the trade was not consummated until Tampa Bay made its pick official.

    More so this year than ever, we're going to see a lot of activity. (We've already seen some with the Jets-Falcons-Broncos three-way trade involving John Abraham.) Anytime you have a good number of quarterbacks projected to go in the first round, there will be more action -- and we could see three get taken in the first 10 picks this year.

    If, for example, the Texans can move down from No. 1 to No. 4, they'll still be in great shape. They might not get who they want, but they'll be in the same plateau and save themselves millions of dollars.

    You can be sure that much of the trade talk already has transpired. And to make things more of a science, teams have their own systems of "ranking" every spot in the draft. That way they can mix and match picks like a puzzle.

    For instance, let's examine the 2004 draft-day trade between the Giants and Chargers. The Giants wanted Eli Manning, whom the Chargers took with the No. 1 overall selection. They got him, but they gave up their pick (fourth overall, who was Philip Rivers), a third-round pick in 2004, and first- and fifth-round picks in 2005. (San Diego took Shawne Merriman with New York's first-round choice last year.)

    Was it worth it? For now it's too soon to really tell, but one way we can figure out who got the edge of this trade is to consult the following chart, which is one NFL team's value chart, obtained by NFL.com.

    Click here for chart

    According to this chart, the first overall pick is worth 3,000 points and the fourth overall pick is worth 1,800. The third-round pick the Chargers got, which they used on Nate Kaeding, was the No. 65 pick overall, worth 265 points. The first rounder they got from the Giants this year is No. 12 overall, worth 1,200 points, and the fifth rounder was 144th overall (San Diego traded it to Tampa Bay). That was worth 34 points.

    Do the math, and for the 3,000 point pick the Giants got, they gave up picks totaling 3,299 points. That's not bad considering they unloaded two first-round picks plus two more picks for Manning's services.

    Here's another example: In 2003, the Bears dealt the No. 4 overall pick to the Jets for their pair of first-round picks, Nos. 14 and 22. According to the chart, the Bears gave up a pick worth 1,800 for picks totaling 1,880. That's about as close to even as can be. The Bears used the picks on DE Michael Haynes and QB Rex Grossman while the Jets took DT Dewayne Robertson.

    Of course, how these trades work out is another matter. And it often takes years to evaluate that sort of thing. But it's amazing to see how the process has evolved over the years. And you can be sure that when trades are consummated this weekend, more went into it than the 15 minutes between picks.

    Art of the draft deal

    "If at first you don't succeed, parachuting is not for you"

  2. #2
    olson_10's Avatar
    olson_10 is offline Ring of Fame
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    4,215

    Re: Art of the draft deal

    good read..thanks for posting
    People who see life as anything more than pure entertainment are missing the point.

  3. #3
    mnwildfan79's Avatar
    mnwildfan79 is offline Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    78

    Re: Art of the draft deal

    Interesting article.

    I've always felt that the draft chart is silly because the draft classes are so different from year to year.

    In general I think the chart gives too much value to the top 5 picks, but that's just me.

  4. #4
    viks_fan21's Avatar
    viks_fan21 is offline Asst. Coach
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    644

    Re: Art of the draft deal

    That is pretty interesting. I hope that nothing comes of that wasted 7th rounder Toniu Fonoti. That would get me pissed.

  5. #5
    ChiTownVike's Avatar
    ChiTownVike is offline Hall of Famer
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,685

    Re: Art of the draft deal

    That is a pretty interseting article

    There is more than 7 round of drafting??

    I didnt know that



    Thank you Josdin for the sig

  6. #6
    ShanePurpleBlood's Avatar
    ShanePurpleBlood is offline Coordinator
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    772

    Re: Art of the draft deal

    "Williamson8211" wrote:
    That is a pretty interseting article

    There is more than 7 round of drafting??

    I didnt know that
    You must not be old enough to remember. I remember it being like 12 rounds or something like that. The cut it down to 7 rounds sometime in the last 15 years.

    Another great sig by PPE!
    SKOL VIKINGS!!!
    Vikings #1
    Raiders #2
    Hawkeyes #1
    Longhorns #2

  7. #7
    whackthepack is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    6,535

    Re: Art of the draft deal

    "Williamson8211" wrote:
    That is a pretty interseting article

    There is more than 7 round of drafting??

    I didnt know that

    Length of draft:

    30 rounds in the 1940's & 50's

    lowered to:

    20 rounds in 1960

    17 rounds in 1967

    12 rounds in 1977

    8 rounds in 1993

    7 rounds in 1994
    What we've got here is failure to communicate.

  8. #8
    NodakPaul's Avatar
    NodakPaul is offline Jersey Retired
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    West Fargo, ND
    Posts
    17,602
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Art of the draft deal

    "mnwildfan79" wrote:
    Interesting article.

    I've always felt that the draft chart is silly because the draft classes are so different from year to year.

    In general I think the chart gives too much value to the top 5 picks, but that's just me.
    You are right. I would assume that the actual values are modified each year by individual teams, depending on their strengths and weaknesses and the depth of the draft at those positions. At least I would hope so...
    Zeus wrote:
    When are you going to realize that picking out the 20 bad throws this year and ignoring the 300 good ones does not make your point?

    =Z=

Similar Threads

  1. UPDATE: 2 early Vikings 7 round mock draft (updated after Jared Allen Deal)
    By WINchester FIELDer in forum Vikings Offseason/Draft/FA Forum
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 04-24-2008, 04:16 PM
  2. Will megamall deal usher in a stadium deal for Vikings?
    By singersp in forum Vikings Fan Forum
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 04-23-2008, 04:49 AM
  3. Gray deal done with Texans, Sage deal next?
    By Garland Greene in forum Vikings Offseason/Draft/FA Forum
    Replies: 91
    Last Post: 04-05-2008, 09:41 AM
  4. Marshall Faulk and Howie Mandel on Deal No Deal
    By Iron Lungs in forum General NFL Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-23-2007, 09:05 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •